ameren missouri

Updated 10/1/2014 to add comments.

Missouri is making headway toward developing a Comprehensive State Energy Plan Wednesday with the inaugural public meeting in St. Louis of the plan's steering committee.

Also on Wednesday, the state's largest electric energy provider, Ameren, released its energy plan for the next two decades.

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File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia Police Department is warning that scammers are posing as representatives from the IRS or from Ameren Missouri in an attempt to get people to quickly send them money.

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Ameren Missouri is seeking approval to add about $1.50 to customers' monthly electric bills.

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Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation directing Missouri regulators to develop their own standards for carbon dioxide pollution from power plants.

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Missouri's largest power company is seeking approval for a $264 million rate increase.

Ameren to install $145 million piece in reactor

Jun 23, 2014
Ameren Missouri

Workers at Ameren’s Callaway Energy Center near Fulton will install a new, multi-million dollar piece of equipment later this year.

Ameren said it’s a nuclear reactor vessel head, which protects important parts of the reactor, and will be installed during a refueling outage in a few months. Barry Cox, Ameren’s Senior Director of Nuclear Operations, said the outage will come around mid-October.

The piece will replace a 30-year-old vessel head, which has been in use since the reactor opened back in 1984. Ameren said it invested $145 million in the new part.

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Crews have removed about 18,000 tons of contaminated soil from a downtown Columbia site contaminated with possible carcinogens from a former manufactured gas plant.

File Photo / Ameren Missouri

The city of St. Louis is opposing a request by Noranda Aluminum for state regulators to lower the electricity rates it pays to Ameren Missouri.

An attorney for the city wrote to the Missouri Public Service Commission, saying that if Noranda's electric rates are lowered, it could result in higher costs for other consumers. City Counselor Michael Garvin says that it could cost St. Louis an additional $3 million over 10 years.

Noranda has sought about a 25 percent reduction in the rate Ameren charges at its aluminum smelter in the southeastern Missouri town of New Madrid.

File photo / KBIA

State utility regulators have publicly released a confidential report detailing how much money has been earned by Ameren Missouri.

The Missouri Public Service Commission decided Tuesday to unseal a November report that has been at the heart of a complaint. The complaint alleges the St. Louis-based electric company was earning more than it was allowed to.

The newly released documents also include testimony from utility regulation consultants hired by Noranda Aluminum, which is leading the challenge of Ameren's electricity rates.

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  St. Louis-based utility company Ameren announced today that executive Michael Moehn has been named chairman, president and chief executive officer of the utility's Ameren Missouri subsidiary.

Moehn succeeds Warner Baxter, who will become Ameren CEO on April 24.

Moehn has held several leadership roles since joining Ameren in 2000.

Ameren provides electric and natural gas services in parts of Missouri and Illinois.

File Photo / Ameren Missouri

Two separate complaints were filed by Noranda Aluminum against Ameren Missouri after data showed Ameren earned more than what the state allows.

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Ameren Missouri has begun cleaning up a Superfund site in downtown Columbia that is contaminated by tars from a former manufactured-gas plant.

The utility plans to remove about 36,000 tons of dirt from the site and truck it to the Jefferson City landfill. Work is expected to be completed by the end of July.

The manufactured-gas plant was located at the site from 1875 to 1932. The company used the site for its headquarters after coal gasification ended.

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Missouri utility regulators have signed off on an agreement involving Ameren Missouri over solar rebates.

Ameren Missouri asked the Public Service Commission last month for permission to suspend payment of the rebates.

The agreement approved Wednesday calls for the utility to continue the rebates up to a maximum of nearly $92 million. Ameren had paid nearly $22 million from August 2012 through October of this year.

Lance Cheung for USDA / Flickr

Missouri's largest utility, Ameren Missouri, is seeking an early halt to a solar rebate program that rewards consumers for using alternative energy sources.

Kansas City Power & Light made a similar request in July.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Ameren Missouri is asking the Missouri Public Service Commission for permission to curtail payment of millions of dollars in solar rebates before the year's end.

The company says it has received more than $35 million in solar rebate requests, creating a financial strain.

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The mother of two Boone County children electrocuted in a 2012 Fourth of July boat dock accident at Lake of the Ozarks is suing the utility company that owns the popular recreational lake.

A wrongful death lawsuit filed in July in Morgan County by Angela Anderson of Ashland claims that Union Electric Co. failed to notify lake dock owners of the need to install electrical protection devices known as ground fault interrupters. The utility operates under the name Ameren Missouri.

Christopher S. Penn / Flickr

Ameren Missouri customers can expect to see a slightly lower bill after state regulators determined the utility owes its electric customers slightly more than $26 million for failing to include some revenue in its calculations.

The Missouri Public Service Commission approved an order Wednesday for the St. Louis-based company to refund the money to customers. But Ameren Missouri won't be sending out checks. Instead, the $26.3 million will be applied by adjusting a fuel charge that customers otherwise would pay.

Missouri's lone nuclear reactor remains shut down while workers and officials continue to investigate what caused a small fire at the Callaway County plant Friday night.

Ameren Missouri spokesman Cleve Reasoner said it'll be several days before the plant is back online.

File photo / KBIA

The Callaway Energy Center near Fulton remains closed after a small fire in the turbine building.

Ameren Missouri says that workers have been performing tests and repairing damage from a small fire Friday night. The fire was in the "non-nuclear" power-generation side of the Callaway County nuclear facility. An Ameren spokesman says cables that connect the plant to the electric grid shorted, causing nearby insulation to catch fire.

An earlier press release said the center is "out of service in accordance with safety protocols and procedures."

Environmental groups are once again urging state officials to require groundwater monitoring at Ameren’s coal-fired power plants in eastern Missouri.

The Sierra Club and Labadie Environmental Organization submitted a letter to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources on Thursday asking the state not to allow Ameren to build new coal ash landfills before testing groundwater for contamination.

File Photo / Ameren Missouri

Ameren Missouri and Westinghouse found out today they were not chosen to receive funding from the US Department of Energy for a project to build Small Modular Reactors at Ameren’s Callaway County plant in Fulton.

Newscast for October 29, 2012

Oct 29, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Senator Claire McCaskill's mother passes away
  • MU School of Professional Health Dean to step down at end of academic year
  • Some students question university police marijuana arrest policy
  • Ameren Missouri and Illinois send crew members to East Coast
  • Wrongful death lawsuit filed involving Bustamante case
The Birkes / Flickr

Ameren Missouri and Illinois are sending additional crew members today to the East Coast to help with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. 

Survivors of an elderly Columbia couple who died in a natural gas explosion four years ago have settled a wrongful death lawsuit against Ameren Missouri.

The Columbia Daily Tribune reports that Boone County court officials were told of the settlement Monday, one day before the case was to go to trial.

The blast in March 2008 destroyed the home of 87-year-old Carl Sneed and his 85-year-old wife, Merna. Both were retired professors at the University of Missouri. Carl Sneed taught mechanical engineering; his wife taught home economics.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has put a freeze on issuing licenses for new plants and 20-year renewals for existing ones following a ruling by a federal Appeals Court.

The US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit ruled in June that the practice of allowing nuclear plants to store spent fuel rods on site doesn’t meet federal environmental standards.  The decision in essence bars the awarding of any new licenses until the industry begins addressing the problem of storing nuclear waste.

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Missouri utility regulators have given approval for what Ameren Missouri calls the most aggressive energy efficiency plan ever in the state.

Under the plan approved Wednesday by the Missouri Public Service Commission, Ameren will invest $147 million over three years in several programs that seek to reduce electricity use by 800 million megawatt-hours.

The plan was part of a negotiated settlement among Ameren, PSC staff, consumer advocates and environmental groups.

File photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon and University of Missouri president Tim Wolfe will join utility executives and business leaders at an event designed to boost support for building small modular nuclear reactors in the state.

The event Monday on the Columbia campus is billed as an economic development summit, while officials await word on a U.S. Department of Energy grant application.

Westinghouse Electric Co. and Ameren Missouri are competing for a share of the $452 million the energy department has set aside for the new technology.

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forwardstl / flickr

St. Louis-based Ameren Missouri presented details of its energy efficiency plan to the Missouri Public Service Commission on Monday.  The proposal would cost around $145 million, which would result in the average home electric bill going up about $3 per month.  Ameren officials say, though, the plan would result in long-term savings of nearly half a billion dollars.  Kevin Gunn chairs the Public Service Commission, which heard the utility’s presentation in Jefferson City.

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forwardstl / flickr

Ameren shareholders have voted against three proposals that sought to push the company to do more to address environmental risks from its coal-fired power plants.