archaeology

Ashley Reese / KBIA

Archeologists now have a new reason to come to MU. As part of a new pilot program, the university is receiving artifacts on loan from the world's oldest museum, the Capitoline Museum of the City of Rome.

The MU Museum of Art and Archeology has already received its first loan- a set of 249 black-gloss ceramics dating back to the Roman Republic. The program will send a variety of loans to the university through December 31, 2017.

This Dirty Little Weed May Have Cleaned Up Ancient Teeth

Jul 22, 2014

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Unlocking prairie secrets from a sod house

May 1, 2014
Jackie Sojicko / Harvest Public Media

 

Ecologists in Nebraska are trying to find out what the Great Plains looked like when homesteaders settled there in the 19th century. To do that, they’re working with a team of archaeologists and historians dissecting a sod house, a house built out of bricks cut from dirt.

Larry Estes has had a sod house in his backyard in Gates, Neb., for as long as he can remember. He never really thought anything about it until a year ago when a repairman asked him about it.

MU assistant professor finds rare fossils in China

Apr 14, 2014

MU assistant professor of geological sciences James Schiffbauer and his team have found rare 500 year old fossilized embryos in China.  Now, they are studying how those fossils stayed preserved.

Archaeologists unearth more clues from ancient Cahokia civilization

May 29, 2013
KBIA

On a blustery day in April, Italian archaeology student Marco Valeri stepped into an archaeological dig at the Cahokia Mounds

MU archaeology program reacts to predicted industry job growth

Mar 19, 2012
Missouri Department of Transportation

In an archaeological ceramics class at MU, students are learning how humans in the past made pottery. But about three years ago, anthropology professor Todd VanPool started another class in response to a growing demand for professional archaeologists. Over the summer, students can earn credit for fieldwork at a dig site in New Mexico.

“They can learn how to, uh, use the tools properly, how to fill out the forms and do all the things that we expect from professional archaeologists,” VanPool said.