Barack Obama

Jameson Hsieh / AP

The man who posted a video on his Facebook page of a Missouri State Fair rodeo act that mocked President Barack Obama says he's been the target of hateful comments for the last two weeks.

Perry Beam, of Higginsville, told The Kansas City Star that if he had known that the video would attract national attention and criticism, he would have left it on his cell phone.

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

Amidst reports that the White House is considering military action in Syria, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt says the United States already missed the point to have a real impact at the early stages of that country's conflict.

Missouri Division of Tourism

Thursday in the KBIA newsroom we had what I consider a valuable discussion. And it came out of a notoriously stupid act at the Missouri State Fair this week.

Sedalia was swarming with politicians Thursday, as office holders from both parties descended on the Missouri State Fair.

Nearly a thousand people, politicians and citizens alike, dined on country ham, eggs and peaches at the Governor's Ham Breakfast.  Governor Jay Nixon began his annual speech by condemning the incident in which a rodeo clown wore a President Obama mask this weekend.

Andrew Nichols / KBIA

The Boonville R-1 School District Board of Education held a special session Tuesday night to discuss investigating the superintendent’s possible involvement in a controversial stunt at the Missouri State Fair. 

Superintendent Mark Ficken was the announcer at the Missouri State Fair’s bull-riding event Saturday when a clown appeared in a mask resembling President Barack Obama and asked the crowd if it wanted to see Obama stomped by a bull.  Now, Boonville’s school board says it has hired a consultant to investigate Ficken’s involvement. 

KBIA

Updated 10:28am, 12:56pm

Missouri State Fair director Mark Wolfe says the rodeo clown responsible for the controversial act over the weekend has been banned from the fair.  The clown had donned a mask of President Obama and asked spectators if they wanted to see "Obama run down by a bull."

Missouri Division of Tourism

  This story is updating

People and politicians are speaking out against an incident at the the Missouri State Fair on Saturday. A clown wearing a President Barack Obama mask appeared at a rodeo this weekend, and the announcer asked spectators if they wanted to see "Obama run down by a bull."

Andrew Nichols / KBIA

The President discussed an American economy that's turning around, comparing where the country was five years ago to today. Obama says the basic American bargain of hard work paying off is alive again because private sector job growth is at its strongest since 1999, healthcare costs are shrinking, and the U.S. is becoming self-sufficient when it comes to energy use.

Andrew Nichols / KBIA News

 

In his speech in Warrensburg, President Barack Obama praised a Missouri program that allows selected high school students to graduate from college early and gain work experience as they do so. 

“I want other colleges to take a look at what's being done here,” Obama said.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon is joining President Barack Obama during the president's upcoming visit to the University of Central Missouri.

Obama is traveling Wednesday to the Warrensburg school and to Galesburg, Ill., to make his case for spending on infrastructure and for universal pre-school programs. The president is also expected to highlight the economic benefits of overhauling immigration laws.

Wikimedia Commons / wikimedia commons

President Barack Obama has declared a major disaster declaration after severe storms struck Missouri from May 29 to June 10.

The Kansas City Star is reporting President Barack Obama will visit Warrensburg, MO next week. There isn't much information yet on the specifics of the visit, but we'll keep you updated.

The Missouri House has passed legislation that declares any future federal ban on semi-automatic weapons or large capacity clips is "unenforceable" in Missouri.

Leader Nancy Pelosi / Flickr

Every Friday, KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk talks about the week's most interesting articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues. 

'Redneck reality' and rural portrayal in cable television

Entertainment newspaper The A.V. Club muses on A&E's popular reality show Duck Dynasty, saying the show is the 21st century incarnation of old rural-themed sitcoms that once dominated network television. Think Petticoat JunctionThe Beverly Hillbillies, and Hee-Haw. It's an interesting read, but we were especially interested with the author's take on ways the television shows have to negotiate the rural-urban political disparities. 

While the rural-themed programming of days gone by tended to depict the small Southern town as a bucolic haven for good-hearted folk, redneck reality is more apt to acknowledge the social and economic ills of the subcultures it depicts. These shows are sanitized for the protection of viewers with blue-state sensibilities; when they occur at all, political discussions tend to center on generalized platitudes about freedom and family, rather than specifics that might turn off half the potential audience.

 

H/T: The Rural Blog

Did headlines about death rates at rural hospitals tell the wrong story?
The Daily Yonder is killing it with their opinion pieces this week. 

Case in point: A new report made headlines last week, saying death rates are rising at rural, geographically isolated hospitals. But an opinion writer for the Yonder says news reports are not telling the real story of these so-called critical access hospitals:

The patients in the small rural hospital with heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia have become a select population. A large proportion has decided that they are through paying all the human costs of the miracles of modern medicine. They have made the decision to stay in familiar surroundings near home and family. 

The researchers found that 13.3% of the patients at critical access hospitals with one of the three conditions died, compared to 11.4 % of the medical center patients. Given all the terrible tools that modern medical centers have to work with, I’m amazed they only manage a small difference in patient survival over the most basic, little country hospitals in America. 

nomadsoul1 / dreamstime

In his proposed budget, President Barack Obama wants to delay cuts to federal payments to hospitals, keeping the payments intact for an extra year. That could affect the debate over expanding Medicaid in Missouri.

Through what’s called the disproportionate share hospital payments or DSH payments, the federal government gives money to hospitals that provide a lot of free care to patients who are uninsured and can’t afford services. The Affordable Care Act, though, includes significant cuts to DSH payments.

A Republican-led Missouri Senate committee has defeated a plan to expand Medicaid under President Barack Obama's health care law.

The Senate Appropriations Committee rejected the legislation on a party-line vote Wednesday, just minutes after hearing testimony from more than two dozen witnesses in favor of the plan.

A Republican-led House committee defeated a similar bill last month in the same fashion.

gun
Drab Mayko / FLICKR

A Missouri Senate panel is trying to prevent the enforcement in the state of President Barack Obama's executive orders on gun control.

File

The minimum wage in Missouri increased 10 cents to $7.35 cents to start the New Year.

That may go up in the near future.

In the State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said he wants to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour.

“Today, a full-time worker making the minimum wage earns $14,500 a year. Even with the tax relief we've put in place, a family with two kids that earns the minimum wage still lives below the poverty line. That's wrong,” Obama said.

Andrew Yost / KBIA

President Obama will speak to the nation with the annual State of the Union address Tuesday night. Columbia citizens voiced their expectations for the address, commenting on Obama’s previous term and what expectations they had for the next four years. Some were hopeful, while others were more disgruntled.

Alex E. Proimos / FLICKR

Doctors and other medical professionals could be in line for a pay hike under Governor Jay Nixon's plan to expand Medicaid eligibility in Missouri.

Vox Efx / Flickr

The status quo has got to go? Not in Missouri.

Based on election results this past week, Missouri voters might be better described as gung ho for the status quo.

Charlie Neibergall / AP Images

In just a few days, we’ll find out whether Barack Obama or Mitt Romney will be leading the world’s most powerful country for the next four years.   

While Americans are eager to leave the grueling political season behind, many in foreign countries are eager to hear the first hints about their biggest concern, foreign policy.

Malwack / Wikimedia Commons

The 2012 presidential campaign has been unlike anything Missouri voters have seen in quite some time. Or perhaps "not seen" is a better description.

Neither Democratic President Barack Obama nor Republican challenger Mitt Romney has held any public campaign events in Missouri since winning his party's nomination. And neither has run TV ads specifically targeting Missouri.

That's a sharp contrast with the 2008 elections and the intense presidential campaigns that Missourians have come to expect over the past several decades.

Kelsey Kerwin / KBIA

More than a hundred MU students gathered on campus for last night’s presidential debate between President Barack Obama and Presidential candidate and former Governor Mitt Romney.

Several MU student groups, including Tigers Against Partisan Politics, the Missouri Students Association and Associated Students at the University of Missouri, hosted the event to encourage more students to learn about politics. The groups are sponsoring the nonpartisan watch parties at each Presidential debate.

Kyle Stokes / KBIA

In another face-off between the presidential candidates, the format for tomorrow’s debate might create a different tone in the discussion.

An expert at MU said the second Presidential Debate could be a challenge for both candidates. President Barack Obama was criticized by some for not being aggressive in the last debate and said he would perform better in the next debate.

Malwack / Wikimedia Commons

Missouri Democratic and Republican strategists weighed in on the campaign trail for their parties after Wednesday night's first Presidential debate.

Ninh Pham / KBIA

The responses of local Republican voters to last night's Presidential debate echo what many pundits are saying nationally - that Presidential candidate Mitt Romney came out stronger than expected. Meanwhile, Democratic supporters of President Barack Obama say the President held his ground.

Approximately 100 supporters for Romney gathered last night at the  Boone County GOP office to watch the first of a series of debates between Romney and President Obama.

Sandhya Dirks / Iowa Public Radio

The presidential candidates have yet to meet in a face-to-face debate. But last week in Des Moines, Iowa, ag leaders witnessed a preview of sorts during a Presidential Forum on Agriculture held in advance of the annual meeting of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture.

KBIA File Photo

Republican gubernatorial candidate Dave Spence has begun running a TV ad linking Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to President Barack Obama.

The ad that began airing Tuesday criticizes the Democratic governor for implementing Obama's economic stimulus act in Missouri and shows pictures of Obama and Nixon together. Spence's ad claims that the stimulus has failed and that Missouri's economy is poor.

Nixon's campaign manager claimed Spence is running a "dishonest and desperate" campaign. Nixon asserts that Missouri's economy has been improving.

Pill bottle on money
images_of_money / Flickr

The Legislature's veto override of a bill expanding religious exemptions from insurance coverage for birth control is the latest example of how Missouri has become a center point in a national debate about pregnancy.

Missouri's law is apparently the first to intentionally contradict an Obama administration policy requiring insurers to cover birth control for women at no additional cost. But the override was closer than expected in the House. One lawmaker acknowledged skipping the vote because he was disgruntled with Missouri Right to Life.

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