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Trump's plan cuts taxes, but not for everyone

Nov 17, 2016
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Kim Adams

A cornerstone of Donald Trump’s economic pitch was an overhaul of the U.S. income tax system. The president-elect plans to condense personal tax brackets from seven down to two, with the top rate maxing out at 33 percent — significantly lower than the current top brackets. But that doesn’t mean every American will get a break; under Trump’s proposal, some middle- and lower-income people could actually pay more in taxes.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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Marketplace

What's the latest news on the Trump administration? We'll look at what we might expect from Trump's planned meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe; the complications of managing the government's executive branch; and the president-elect's emerging economic policies. 

Special preview: Codebreaker season two

Nov 16, 2016
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Bruce Johnson

This season on our tech podcast "Codebreaker," we're asking: "Can it save us?" In this special preview of the first episode, you'll hear about a toddler who saved her mother's life with Siri, a man whose mysterious ailment opened up a world of voice recognition technology and a dating service that wants to scan the faces of all your exes. Listen, decode, and decide: Can recognition software save us?

Chart of the day: U.S fast food sales

Nov 16, 2016
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Sarah Menendez

Today is National Fast Food Day, so naturally we felt it was a perfect time to do the numbers on the U.S. fast food industry's biggest players. The chart above shows the change in sales in the last five years, using data from an IBISWorld report published in May. McDonald's holds 15.8 percent of the market share of the fast food industry, followed by Yum! Brands Inc., which holds 8.9 percent and, finally, Subway with 5 percent.

2016 has been a wild year for fast food

Nov 16, 2016
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Sarah Menendez

It's been quite a year for fast food (among other things). Given that today is #NationalFastFoodDay, we took a look back at some of the weird products and new releases from the fast food world this year.  It's likely that none of these gimmicks were meant to give companies any significant sales bumps. So why do it? It's all about the hype.

1. McDonald's doubled down on the all-day breakfast menu

Infrastructure, infrastructure, infrastructure

Nov 16, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

We got a few questions about how Trump's infrastructure plan could get through a Republican-controlled Congress: Mike Rodgers asked, "since history indicates republicans don't want to fund anything, what's that mean for trumps ideas?" Justin Taylor asked, "how long will it take to get a $1 tril #infrastructure bill written, passed, signed, and get projects started, & $ flowing?" Marketplace's Washington D.C Bureau

On today's show, we'll talk about reports that Snapchat's parent company has filed for an IPO;  a request from automakers for Trump to review fuel economy and emissions regulations; and the relationship between weather and commodities. 

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Kim Adams

There are multiple reports that Snap, Inc., the company that owns the messaging app Snapchat, is getting ready to go public. The company reportedly expects to be valued at up to $25 billion, and its IPO could serve to test the waters for other big tech companies that have been relying solely on venture funding.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

You want economy? United has “basic” economy

Nov 16, 2016
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Gigi Douban

Starting next year, United Airlines will begin offering passengers a cheaper option for airline fares. The new “basic economy” fare, which gets you little more than a seat, makes United the latest major airline to try to lure passengers from ultra-low-cost carriers like Spirit and Frontier. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Chicago puts sensors to work taking its vitals

Nov 15, 2016
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Miles Bryan

The city of Chicago is trying to get to know itself a little better.

The city, in partnership with the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory, recently began constructing the Array of Things — a network of 500 data sensors that will track the city's vitals. 

Perched on traffic signal poles, its sensors will monitor things like traffic flow, pedestrian traffic and air quality. The Array of Things is funded largely by a $3.1 million grant from the National Science Foundation, and is set to be fully installed by 2018.

Chart of the day: Education in prison

Nov 15, 2016
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Marketplace staff

A new study from the National Center for Education Statistics found more than half of adults in American prisons lack basic math skills, Inside Higher Ed notes, much higher than the general population. The portion lacking basic literacy was also quite a bit higher.

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Kai Ryssdal

What a difference a week — and election — can make.

In a new poll from Gallup, Americans' confidence in the economy was surveyed in the week before the election and the week after. We've moved from an index score of -10 to +3 — or, in other words, from being slightly negative to slightly positive.

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Amy Scott

As Donald Trump prepares to assume the presidency, calls are growing for the billionaire to cut ties to the business empire that bears his name. Trump has said he'll leave the day-to-day management of the Trump Organization to three of his children. And then appointed those same children to the executive committee of his presidential transition team, meaning they'll be involved in political appointments that could impact the family business.

Why China should top Trump's list

Nov 15, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

The United States and China have had a peaceful but strained relationship for many years, maintained primarily by trade deals and diplomacy between the two countries. President-elect Donald Trump has been very critical of China throughout his campaign, and many are wondering where U.S-China relations will end up under his presidency.

Is fiscal responsibility out the window?

Nov 15, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

You guys had some questions about how Congress will work with a Trump presidency and whether fiscal responsibility will be out the window over the next four years.

We're tackling some of that today on the podcast starting with listener Jim Gordon, who asked: "How much can Trump directly affect policy with existing checks and balances? Will we see interest rates rise?"

Here's Washington Bureau Chief Andrea Seabrook:

On today's show, we'll talk about a growth in retail sales; airline stock gains amid Warren Buffet's decision to invest in American, United, Delta and Southwest; and how teachers are dealing with post-election bullying.

SEC Chair to step down

Nov 15, 2016
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Kim Adams

If you have money in the stock market, then the work of the Securities and Exchange Commission affects you. It's the group tasked with protecting investors and keeping the market functioning smoothly — basically a Wall Street watchdog. The leadership of that group is getting ready to change, with SEC Chair Mary Jo White announcing she will leave the post when President Barack Obama leaves office.

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Amy Scott

The Southern Poverty Law Center has sent out a new survey to teachers asking about the post-election climate in their schools. Since Donald Trump was elected, the anti-hate watchdog group has tallied hundreds of incidents of harassment and bullying at schools and on college campuses. In his recent “60 Minutes” interview with Lesley Stahl, President-elect Trump told supporters to “stop” harassing minorities.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

Congress in session – and not so lame?

Nov 15, 2016
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Adam Allington

Congress is back in Washington, D.C., with a heaping pile of work to do and not much time to do it in. The government only has funding to keep it open until Dec. 9, so the first order of business is some kind of spending bill.

The question confronting lawmakers now is whether to spend big in the waning days of this congressional session or punt to the next.

 Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

How one infrastructure project impacts the economy

Nov 14, 2016
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Reema Khrais

Last year, after his job ended at a local construction site, 21-year-old Alberto Gomez "started getting lazy." 

A month passed, then two, and Gomez said he needed to "get off [his] butt and just go to work again.”

Luckily, he didn’t need to go far. A huge project to rebuild the Sixth Street Viaduct in Los Angeles was just getting started.

The iconic bridge with its swooping steel arches has played a supporting role in more than 1,500 movies and commercials, including “Grease,” “Terminator 2” and “Furious 7.”

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D Gorenstein

Good news for the NFL. The viewership numbers for last night’s Seahawks-Patriots game are in: More than 22 million people watched, the highest audience figures since the beginning of the season. People also flocked to the movies this weekend. According to one box office analysis, revenue surged by as much as 50 percent this weekend

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Kai Ryssdal

Remember how, after Brexit, there were those stories about how the phrase "What is Brexit" saw a surge in Google searches in the U.K.?

Well, this is a true example of the fact that what goes around, comes around.

Federal agencies bracing for big cuts under Trump

Nov 14, 2016
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Adam Allington

With the presidential race finally over, a new race has begun to hand over control of the entire federal government from one administration to the next.

That translates into thousands of political appointees and many more jobs beyond that. But, given that Donald Trump has said repeatedly that he wants to “drain the swamp” in Washington, that could mean significant changes for certain agencies.

Out on the campaign trail, Trump didn’t parse words about which federal agencies he wanted to reduce or even close entirely.

Trump's trillion-dollar infrastructure bill

Nov 14, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal and Andrea Seabrook

It's President-elect Trump Day 6, but who's counting? On Sunday, Trump announced Reince Priebus as White House Chief of Staff and Stephen Bannon as Chief Strategist. Marketplace's DC Bureau Chief Andrea Seabrook explains the reaction from Washington:

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Mark Garrison

Donald Trump's transition team promises to roll back some of the financial regulations put in place after the economic crisis.

One regulatory agency whose future is uncertain: the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. 

As nurses retire, a significant shortage looms

Nov 14, 2016
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Adam Allington

Ten thousand dollar sign-on bonuses and generous benefits? No, we’re not talking about the tech industry; it’s nurses who are now in high demand.

As the economy improves, many older nurses are cutting back hours or retiring, causing a major shortage across the country.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

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D Gorenstein

If Trump and the Republicans pursue their plan to repeal Obamacare, what will happen to birth control? Currently, many types of contraception are available at no out-of-pocket cost. While health care lawyers are debating how quickly the law could be changed, many women are booking visits to their OB-GYNs to get care now — in case services are cut back.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story. 

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Marketplace

On today's show, we'll talk about what the presidential transition team is responsible for; rising concerns from women about birth control access under a Trump administration; and the decline in union support for the Democratic Party this election. 

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Kai Ryssdal

Facebook's algorithm was a little confused earlier today.

A bunch of users — including Mark Zuckerberg himself — had their profiles "memorialized," something that usually only happens when that user has died.

"We hope people who love Mark will find comfort in the things others share to remember and celebrate his life," the banner said.

Will Hollywood write a new script for the Trump era?

Nov 11, 2016
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Reema Khrais

After Donald Trump's surprising victory, the creators of "South Park" frantically rewrote their Wednesday night episode. The script, initially titled "The Very First Gentleman," assumed a Hillary Clinton victory.  

The creators rewrote the script, now titled "Oh Jeez," to reflect Trump's win. 

"I sure am excited. America's going to be great again," says Randy in the episode. His daughter's take: "No, I'm not excited. It sucks, Dad! This country is going to suck for four years." 

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