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Survey says: Americans feel the economy is rigged

Jun 29, 2016
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Nancy Marshall-Genzer

We’re digging into the results of our latest Marketplace-Edison Research poll.  This time we asked whether people feel the economy is rigged in favor of certain groups.  Almost 71 percent of the 1022 people we polled said yes.  That includes majorities of Democrats, Republicans, young, old, rich, poor, blacks, whites and Hispanics.

About 83 percent of the African Americans we polled felt this way.  Including Brad Lewis.

He lives in Washington’s Anacostia neighborhood.

Stock market up for second day in a row

Jun 29, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about the news coming out of the European Union's meetings in Brussels; market psychology following Thursday's Brexit vote; and Obama's last meeting as part of the Three Amigos (the U.S., Canada and Mexico). 

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Marketplace staff

According to our partners at the BBC

The death toll in a gun and suicide bomb attack on Istanbul's Ataturk airport has risen to 41, 13 of them foreign nationals, with 239 injured, the Turkish city's governor says.

Three attackers arrived in a taxi and began firing at the terminal entrance late on Tuesday. They blew themselves up after police fired back.

PM Binali Yildirim said early signs pointed to so-called Islamic State.

U.S. slips in 2016 Social Progress Index

Jun 29, 2016
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Mitchell Hartman

The Social Progress Index for 2016 ranks the United States No. 19 among 133 countries in the world, behind Ireland, France, Canada and New Zealand, and just ahead of Slovenia and Portugal. Full details of the rankings and analysis can be found here

Obama's last ride as part of the Three Amigos

Jun 29, 2016
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JaeRan Kim

The leaders of the three North American countries are gathering Wednesday for the “Three Amigos Summit,” a meeting during which President Barack Obama and his counterparts will discuss a wide variety of interests the nations share.

The discussions will likely include public assurances that the recent decision by United Kingdom voters to withdraw from the European Union will not have overly damaging impact domestically.

If Great Britain goes, so could the English language

Jun 29, 2016
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Sally Herships

Trying to do business internationally can feel like working on the Tower of Babel. But Andy Molinsky, a professor of international management and organizational behavior at Brandeis University's International Business School, said there's a common fix. 

Irish passport applications spike in Brexit wake

Jun 28, 2016
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JaeRan Kim

After the Brexit vote, one hot commodity in the United Kingdom is a passport from a country that will still be in the European Union. Having one will make it easier to travel, live and work within Europe at large. That’s made many turn to Ireland, which isn’t in the U.K. and whose application process is relatively simple. That simplicity only goes so far, however.

A market bounceback

Jun 28, 2016

On today's show, we'll  talk about an uptick in the Dow, Nasdaq and S&P 500; look at the possibility of companies using Brexit as a justification for poor performance; and interview Larry Rosin, the president of Edison Research, about the results of our joint poll on economic anxiety. 

Volkswagen agrees to $14.7 billion settlement

Jun 28, 2016

Volkswagen has agreed to pay $14.7 billion to settle with consumers who bought VW and Audi cars that had small diesel engines designed to cheat emissions tests. This covers 475,000 cars, mainly in the U.S., and grants VW owners with a useful option if they don't want VW to try to fix the cars — which could reduce the vehicle's performance. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full report. 

Brexit could be a goldmine for lawyers

Jun 28, 2016
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Lane Wallace

News of Britain’s decision to leave the European Union has gone over pretty badly with a lot of global industries and markets. But there’s at least one industry where the whole thing might actually be a windfall: the legal industry.

Yep, your very favorite people are licking their chops right now — and by licking their chops, we mean fielding a bunch of panicky calls from clients.

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Andy Uhler

Norway is not a member of the European Union. But through the European Economic Area Agreement and European Free Trade Association, it maintains a close trade relationship with the rest of the Continent. That relationship is key to its economy. But Fiona Hill, director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution, said Norwegian officials she's spoken with don't think the relationship is all that favorable. 

Americans' anxiety around the economy grows

Jun 27, 2016
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Andrea Seabrook

Welcome to the post-Brexit world – a global economic outlook more uncertain than ever.

Brexit: Corporations read the fine print

Jun 27, 2016
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Sally Herships

In the world of corporate contract law, Brexit isn’t actually that unusual.  That is, when it's considered as grounds for language,  meant to protect your firm, listed within the fine print of a corporate legal contract. 

Here's what financial advisers are saying about Brexit

Jun 27, 2016
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Mark Garrison and Tony Wagner

The global economic turmoil that followed last week's Brexit has promoted financial advisers to spring into action Monday. Advisers had already been on guard, but the huge market reaction to the surprise "remain" vote meant financial planners had to get emailing. We cleared out our own inboxes and complied their insights for you to peruse.

The European Union's grand experiment

Jun 27, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about the shape of the world's markets following Thursday's Brexit vote; how uncertainty may start plaguing the U.K. auto industry; and the future of Europe. 

What are the true costs of Medicare?

Jun 27, 2016
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D Gorenstein

New research raises questions about the cost of expanding Medicaid – the health care program for low-income and disabled Americans.

Some 19 states have yet to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act – often thanks to concerns about the sticker price.

With the recent "Brexit" vote causing turmoil in the world's markets, Britain's finance minister George Osborne is trying to calm U.K. citizens. 

His efforts to stop people from panicking contrast with his rhetoric prior to the referendum. Osborne warned that a vote for Brexit would lead to a cataclysm, causing him to introduce an emergency budget, hike taxes and make spending cuts. 

Click the above audio player to hear the full report. 

 

  

Welcome to Episode 1 of our summer season. This show is the Getting Your$elf Together checklist, for those recent grads and young professionals in the audience working on starting their careers. We cover navigating the job hunt, settling into your new workplace, creating an impact in your office and making adult life work.

The hidden fallout of Brexit

Jun 24, 2016
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Andy Uhler

Wall Street's head is still spinning from the Brexit, but the fallout is short-term. We spoke with experts who said U.K.'s split from the European Union will have us talking about what this means for businesses and the global economy for the next decade.

Fiona Hill, director of the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution

Currency traders take a wild ride during Brexit

Jun 24, 2016

Foreign currency traders spent the night glued to their screens as the results came in that U.K. decided to leave the European Union. Yra Harris is a Chicago-based veteran trader who shares his experience trading the pound during the Brexit vote.

Click the audio player to listen to his story.

Yes, the Brexit is about immigration

Jun 24, 2016
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Golda Arthur

Brexit was in large part driven by an anti-immigration backlash, but exactly what kind of immigration was in the firing line?

Not just the migrants who have been in our headlines for the last year, the flow of refugees moving out of Syria and the Middle East and crossing in boats and trucks to Europe.

The target for this hardened stance on immigration was Europe itself: in particular, Eastern Europeans from countries like Poland, who have been moving to Britain in large numbers over the past decade or so.

What does Brexit mean for you?

Jun 24, 2016
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Kim Adams

What happened?

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Kai Ryssdal

There's a context slice of the Brexit story that we need to get to before the day is done -- the place that Thursday's vote has in the global economy, and in history, really.

Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers wrote a quick post last night for The Washington Post. We got him on his cell phone Friday to talk more about it:

The future of the Bank of England's governor

Jun 24, 2016

On today's show, we'll talk about a drop in the value of the British pound following the recent Brexit vote; David Cameron's decision to step down as prime minister; and whether the governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, will remain in his position. 

What U.S. leaders have to say about Brexit

Jun 24, 2016
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Greta Hallberg

The final votes were tallied early Friday morning and the U.K. voted to leave the European Union, rattling global markets. Here are the official statements about the news from major U.S. players:

The Federal Reserve:

What you should do when the markets go crazy

Jun 24, 2016
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Kim Adams

Prepare for a lot of red today. Global markets are down in response to the U.K. referendum to leave the European Union. Some traders are saying they haven’t seen volatility like this since 2008, which can be a lesson for individual investors.

When markets go crazy, investors seeing sharp declines in their retirement or other accounts might feel the urge to sell and cut their losses. Jennifer Myers, a financial planner and president of Sagevest Wealth Management in Virginia, warned that people shouldn’t panic.

A look at Brexit's impact on Asia

Jun 24, 2016
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Rob Schmitz

As it became clear overnight that Britain will be leaving the European Union, markets in Asia were the first to react. In Seoul, markets tumbled nearly 4 percent. The stock markets of Hong Kong and Shanghai were down. 

And in Japan, the Nikkei was down 8 percent. Stocks in the country suffered their worst day in five years.

At the start of the day, the yen was trading at 106 to the dollar — that dropped to 99 to the dollar as global investors sought a safe haven for their money, said Gavekal Dragonomics’ Arthur Kroeber.

Some still optimistic in the face of Brexit vote

Jun 24, 2016
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Marketplace staff

The U.K. has decided to leave the European Union, casting uncertainty over immigration, trade and the world's financial markets. "Leave" voters won 52 percent to 48 percent, according to our partners at the BBC. 

But despite the turmoil that global markets and "Remain" voters  are currently facing, some business leaders are still projecting enthusiasm about the region's future. 

Brexit vote rattles markets

Jun 24, 2016
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Kim Adams

Global markets are already reacting to the decision by U.K. voters to leave the European Union. The “Leave” voters won by a tiny margin in Thursday’s referendum, edging out those who wished to remain in the political and economic union by just a few percentage points.

That came as a surprise to many, according to Michael Hewson, chief market analyst at CMC Markets in London.

“The betting markets had really been banking on a 'remain' vote," he said. "Certainly the direction of travel for equity markets and the pound had pretty much been a one-way bet all of this week.”

What's the mood in London after the Brexit vote?

Jun 23, 2016
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Kai Ryssdal

Polls in the U.K. are now closed on the referendum vote that determines if the nation will exit the European Union. We won't know the results for a few more hours, but Marketplace's Stephen Beard checks in from London about how people are feeling now that the vote is over, the role weather has played and Wall Street's initial reaction.

Click on the audio player above to listen.

 

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