cancer

Amylovesyah / Flickr

 

MU's School of Veterinary Medicine is in the research phase with bacteria and molecules that could change the treatment of cancer. 

Credit Via Coldwater Creek Facts PowerPoint presentation.

St. Louis County health officials say they will hire researchers to study illness rates among residents near a creek that was contaminated decades ago by nuclear waste.

pills
Pink Sherbert Photography / Flickr

Missouri cancer patients soon could find it more affordable to take chemotherapy pills.

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acephotos1 / dreamstime

Some cancer patients want Missouri legislators to make chemotherapy pills more affordable.

New data are adding to concerns that exposure to radioactive waste in Coldwater Creek could be causing cancers and other health problems.

Nuclear waste generated by the Mallinckrodt Company was dumped in North St. Louis County after World War II, contaminating the creek and surrounding areas.

Nate Anton / Favs Columbia

Death. It's often a taboo topic of conversation, despite its inevitability.

But that's not the case for everyone. David Oliver, retired medical professor at MU, and his wife, Debbie, gave a presentation yesterday evening (Dec. 3) titled, "Our Exit Strategy: Depriving Death of Its Strangeness."

saharaaldridge.blogspot.com

A new Missouri law creates a checkbox on Missouri income tax forms that allows taxpayers to contribute a minimum of $1 of their tax return to fund pediatric cancer research.

“Sahara’s Law” was introduced by Cape Girardeau Republican Senator Wayne Wallingford, and it’s named after Sahara Aldridge. 

“She was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor and she fought that battle for 17 months, going through chemotherapy and radiation and even some alternate treatments,” Wallingford said. “But sadly she passed away when she was 13.”

grabadonut / Flickr

In separate studies both published on Wednesday, researchers at Washington University helped lead the genomic analysis of two types of cancer.

e-MagazineArt / FLICKR

A national consortium of scientists has sequenced the genome of a common type of lung cancer. The work suggests that the key to treating cancer may lie in understanding its genes.

Washington University helped lead the study, which mapped and analyzed genetic mutations in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

The director of Wash U’s Genome Center, Richard Wilson, says the study identified mutations in lung tumors that are also found in other types of cancer.

He says the work suggests the genetics of cancer are more important than where it first appears in the body.

On cancer

Jul 19, 2012
Andres Pérez / Flickr

On today’s show, we’ll have a look at cancer.

Scott Suppelsa

Pediatric leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. There are about 3,000 new cases in the United States every year, typically in children between the ages of four and six.

With treatment, about three-quarters of affected children are able to beat the disease.

But for those with what’s known as “high risk” leukemia, the odds of survival are much worse.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Columbia officials meet for two-day retreat
  • Commission accepting applications for Mo. Supreme Court
  • Rally against president's contraceptive mandate held at Mo. Capitol
  • WiFi coming to state parks
  • Phone line could play role in cancer prevention

Phone line could play role in cancer prevention

Jun 8, 2012

A new study out of Washington University has found that the 2-1-1 phone information system could be an effective tool to fight cancer in low-income and minority communities.

Across the U.S., people can call 2-1-1 to get help with housing, food, and other social service needs.

Petitions submitted for Missouri tobacco tax increase

May 4, 2012

Supporters of a ballot initiative to raise Missouri’s cigarette tax turned in signatures today.

National Cancer Institute

More than half of cancer cases in the United States could be prevented.