classical music

Jack Howard / KBIA

One way CoMO Explained chooses topics for our episodes is from listener questions. Way back in our first iteration of the show a listener posted on Reddit and asked us why KBIA, an NPR station, plays so much classical music.

This episode is for that Reddit listener.


  KBIA and the University of Missouri announced plans to buy KWWC.  The lower-power FM station is currently owned by Stephens College.  Pending FCC approval, the new frequency will carry classical music around the clock while KBIA will switch to an all-news format from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the purchase.

cindyt7070 / Flickr

The University of Missouri and KBIA announced today the purchase of 90.5FM KWWC from Stephens College. Pending approval from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), MU will pay Stephens College $50,000 for the station in addition to providing the college with $50,000 in underwriting over a five-year period.

The American Prize

Fans of live classical music performance have an abundance of shows to experience this fall. On this week's Thinking Out Loud  we look at a pair of upcoming performances in Mid-Missouri.

Matthew Washburn

When you were growing up did you play classical music? Did you have your own instrument? The classical classical duo Zofo - made up of Eva-Maria Zimmermann and Keisuke Nakagoshi - play one piano. At the same time. KBIA's Trevor Harris  recently talked with the duo by phone about the nature of playing one piano with four hands, the process of commissioning new music for their repertoire and their new CD Zoforbit.

Credit: JudithZaimont.com

A pair of members of the virtuoso ensemble the Cypress String Quartet recently talked with KBIA's Trevor Harris. That interview and a talk with contemporary American composer Judith Zaimont are the topics on this week's Thinking Out Loud on KBIA.

Steph Mackinnon

The 2014 Gesher Music Festival of Emerging Artists opens this week in St. Louis. This year the festival opening gala features cellist Matt Haimovitz, who is known for pushing the envelope and blurring the lines between classical and popular music.

Credit: IMDB

Each summer, Kirk Trevor and the Missouri Symphony Society take classical music to a range of venues around Columbia and Mid-Missouri. From Stephens Lake Park to Douglass Park to Shelter Gardens, classical music fans get to absorb symphonic and chamber works in a range of diverse settings. This Thursday, the Missouri Symphony Orchestra returns to the Missouri Theatre stage to play film music.

Some believe that learning and listening to music, particularly classical music, at a young age is tied to success in the future. 

In Columbia, there are many efforts to get children interested in classical music: multiple avenues for music education, and even classical music performances in town targeted at kids.

Today on Intersection, we’ll talk about how young people in Mid-Missouri are exposed to these influences, and about some of the challenges in reaching them.

Guests:

Credit: GMD Three, Tyler Boye, Laura Watilo Blake, Lilian Finckel, Ken Blaze

This week on KBIA we're featuring music from the new release by guitarist Jason Vieaux, Play. You can hear tracks from the Azica Recrods release Play this week on KBIA. On this his thirteenth recording, Vieaux offers up a set of seventeen shorter pieces from guitarist-composers including Antonio Lauro and Andres Segovia.


Credit: Gene Royer/MU School of Music

This summer as in the past several summers, a festival comes to Mid-Missouri that brings contemporary classical composers, performers and fans together from around the world.

Facebook/Odyssey Chamber Music Series

Settle in to listen to an hour of classical music on the radio and you'll mostly hear the works of male composers. It isn't that women do not compose in the classical genre, so why don't we hear them more often? KBIA's Ariel Morrision recently asked two local women what's behind the gender imbalance in classical compositions.


Mat Hennik/Deutsche Grammphon

The pianist Helene Grimaud is garnering increasing attention from fans and critics. Her 2012 release, Duo, with cellist Sol Gabetta, is regularly heard on KBIA and was recently nominated for a Grammy. On her latest effort, Brahms: The Piano Concertos, the French-born pianist presents a pair of works for piano and orchestra by 19th century Romantic era composer Johannes Brahms.

MET Orchestra

At an age when many would the considering retirement from active work, the conductor James Levine is back on the podium.

Missouri Symphony Conservatory celebrates the holidays, on KBIA

Dec 4, 2013
Courtesy of MOSS

Have you ever discovered a new hobby that suddenly and completely consumed you? Whether you meant to do it or not your new hobby demands your time and attention. It requires that you find a teacher or a mentor who can help you take your interest to the next level.

Today's Zaman

When violinist Michelle Makarski approached her friend, the pianist Keith Jarrett about playing some Johann Sebastian Bach sonatas, recording those works wasn’t necessarily in their initial plans.

Courtesy: www.EldarMusic.com

From experience I can confirm that it’s hard work to become decent on a musical instrument. No matter the musical genre or instrument, it takes consistent practice to become listenable. I’m not saying I’ve gotten listenable yet with my bass and guitar playing.

Aaron Dunn

Classical music fans are increasingly using the web to share music. On any given evening you could curl up with your laptop or iPad and feast on performances of Beethoven’s Ninth, Durufle’s Requiem and lots more. Services such as the Naxos Music LIbrary make recordings available for a membership fee.

Missouri Symphony Society

Classical music seems like a genre that was made to be performed indoors. Symphonic music was born in the chambers of European royalty and in Catholic churches. The music was created by patrons who wanted to support the arts and also demonstrate their largesse. Take the classical music out of the concert hall and what do you have?

Carl Socolow

Corrected 10:32 a.m., Aug. 12, 2013

Alarm Will Sound made their fourth annual visit to Columbia last week and went where most orchestras fear to tread: they performed music by living, breathing composers.  The two shows by the 20-member ensemble offered a surprising look into the present and future of classical composition. 

Sinquefeld Foundation

Some of the music playing in the Missouri Theatre this week will be heard publicly for the first time ever. That’s because starting Thursday, the University of Missouri School of Music’s annual Mizzou International Composers Festival takes the stage.

Cory Weaver / MU/Alarm Will Sound

The Mizzou International Composers Festival annual music composition festival taking place this summer in Columbia is offering free transportation for a limited number of concert-goers from St. Louis and Kansas City.

The festival begins July 22 and continues through July 27. Venues include the downtown Missouri Theatre and several concert halls on the University of Missouri campus.   Performers include the ensemble Alarm Will Sound.

Missouri Symphony Society

Do you like live music performances? Classical music connoisseurs know when and where local performances happen. But what about our fellow Mid-Missourians who don’t go to the symphony? What’s keeping them away?

Credit: http://www.vibekehellemann.com

To call Lucille Salerno a ragtime champion is an understatement. Salerno was a New York native with a lifelong love of syncopated music.  In 1999, she started organizing ragtime concerts in Columbia.

Wikimedia Commons

Classical music fans who like a little visual to go with their orchestra may enjoy this video featuring an animated graphical score of Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring, Part 1: Adoration of the Earth.

  Missouri culture might be better known for glittering Branson shows, down home fiddle music and hip-hop from our state’s urban centers, but a local performance organization aims to add classical music to the list of artistic creations born in the Show-Me State.

www.simonedinnerstein.com

Making music from the classical repertoire is standard fare for Simone Dinnerstein.

Buchbinder.net

If a classical musician wishes to replicate a sound from a specific period then the musician needs a period instrument. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently interviewed Vienna-based pianist Rudolf Buchbinder.

 

  Columbia native Lindsey Lang along with the Kansas City Chorale won a Grammy award last month in the Best Chorale Performance for their CD 'Life and Breath: Chorale Works by Rene Clausen'. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently interviewed Lang. They visited about Lang's Columbia roots, the Grammy award experience and future plans for Lang and the Kansas City Chorale. 

Violin
A. Vivaldi / Flickr

Klaus Heymann has built NAXOS into one of the world's largest classical music labels. Based in Hong Kong, NAXOS has developed a business model that has led to growth in classical music sales and downloads in a time when sales of physical recordings are generally in decline. KBIA's Trevor Harris recently visited with NAXOS's founder and President Klaus Heymann. Here is their conversation about the economics and politics of recording and distributing classical music in the 21st century.

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