columbia city council

KBIA

The Columbia City Council is considering changing the definition of family in zoning ordinances to include domestic partners.

The current zoning ordinance defines a family as an individual, or a married couple, and their children and no more than two other persons related to the individual. No more than three unrelated people are allowed to live in single-family homes.

Because of that definition, domestic partners were considered unrelated people, which is what a proposed resolution would change.

brick street
orinjuice / flickr

The Columbia City Council tabled a vote that would have created the first-ever written plan to repair and maintain Columbia’s brick-paved streets at its meeting Monday. 

water faucet
Jenn Durfey / flickr

The Columbia City Council voted unanimously Monday night against a resolution that would have discontinued the use fluoride in the city’s water supply.

Many residents had reported health concerns regarding the presence of fluoride in the water, and the Columbia Board of Health investigated these claims earlier this year.

In April, the board voted in favor of continuing the addition of fluoride to the water supply and they sent a report to the council, who put the resolution up to a vote.

airplane
clarkmaxwell / Flickr

The Columbia Regional Airport is adding a second daily flight to Chicago’s O’Hare Airport.

pills
The Javorac / Flickr

The Columbia City Council voted to not pass a bill to rezone 1.39 acres on the corner of Providence Road and East Broadway to build a CVS pharmacy Monday evening. The pharmacy would have consisted of a 13,000 square foot building, drive-thru pharmacy, 65 parking spaces, and more efficient sidewalks along Broadway.

Resident Rosie Gerding expressed her thoughts on the suburban look of the pharmacy would bring to the downtown area.

Columbia City Council adopts new comprehensive plan

Oct 8, 2013
10th and Elm in downtown Columbia
KBIA File Photo / KBIA

The future of the City of Columbia became clearer last night as the Columbia City Council adopted a new comprehensive plan for future growth.

The City Council passed its plan, entitled "Columbia Imagined: The Plan for How We Live and Grow." The plan will influence Columbia’s neighborhoods and public places, development, job creation, transportation options, and the overall vitality of the community.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council has approved a plan that narrows the lanes on Columbia’s busy Clark Lane, and adds a shoulder to the road.

A city council report of possible road construction on Clark Lane in Columbia was met with protest at the City Council meeting Monday night. The plan calls for narrowing the 12 foot lanes of Clark Lane by one foot in each lane and adding at six foot shoulder.

Downtown Columbia parking rates to increase

Sep 17, 2013
Parking meter
File Photo / KBIA

This fall, the cost of parking in downtown Columbia will increase -- but access to public transit will as well.

Columbia City Council members last night amended the city code to raise parking rates for both unmetered off street facilities and metered parking in the MU campus area. The amendment will go into effect October 1. 

Meter prices on campus will increase from 75 cents per hour to $1 per hour. Parking pass prices will go up $10 a month but parking permit consumers will have an unlimited bus pass included in their monthly rate.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Columbia City Council members amended and approved stricter requirements for a controversial potential housing development near Rock Bridge Memorial State Park.

The tougher ordinances affect the amount of impervious surfaces the new development is allowed to have.  Impervious surfaces are surfaces such as streets or sidewalks that reduce the amount of water that soaks into the ground. The changes come on the heels of dozens of water concerns community members voiced about the project.

Columbia City Council renews CAT-TV funding

Sep 4, 2013
File / KBIA

Columbia Access Television is set to receive funding once again under the city's newly proposed budget.

CAT-TV, was not originally included in the fiscal year 2014 budget proposed by the Columbia City Council. But now, because of a $200,000 surplus from last year, the city council has amended the budget to provide that money to CAT-TV. Council members made the change during Tuesday's city council meeting.

Marlith / Flickr

 

    

The Columbia City Council has approved a route for new electrical transmission lines in south Columbia.  

KBIA

Entrepreneurs in Columbia might get a boost from a program being designed to help business startups.

The Columbia City Council last week allocated $150,000 to Regional Economic Development Inc., or REDI, with an original goal of providing loans for new small businesses.

But REDI is instead working with the University of Missouri and the Small Business and Technology Development Center to devise a program that would do more than simply provide loans.

ume-y / flickr

Columbia’s southern region is in need of new electrical transmission lines because of the region’s population increase – and Columbia’s Water and Light Department and City Council are discussing options for the region.

Representatives from the Department and council met yesterday (Thursday) afternoon to discuss one project that would create new transmission lines. Water and Light staff have proposed three line options to the council.

Officials say regardless of the option chosen residents should expect to see a utility-rate increase for the project.

Columbia City Hall
KBIA file photo

Columbia residents identified improvements to public safety, roads and storm water infrastructure as key priorities in a survey conducted by the city council. The council met Friday and Saturday in its annual planning retreat to discuss future payment options.

Blind Boone Ragtime Festival returns to Columbia

Jun 7, 2013
Blind Boone Heritage Foundation

The Blind Boone Ragtime Festival returns to Columbia this Sunday, honoring a local and national legend.  The festival features concerts and seminars from world-class ragtime performers both Monday and Tuesday.  It is named for John William “Blind” Boone, a ragtime musician who lived in Columbia around the turn of the twentieth century and helped pioneer the genre.

Columbia ban on lighted window signs to continue

May 7, 2013
columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

Following Monday night’s Columbia City Council meeting, businesses will face continued restrictions on how they can advertise in their windows.

Columbia plans to expand its parks and trails

May 7, 2013
Columbia Parks and Recreation

The City of Columbia Parks and Recreation Department is reviewing its 10-year development plan.

Columbia council backtracks on Providence Road plans

Apr 16, 2013

Columbia City Council members have agreed to backtrack on previous development plans for Providence Road.  Council members voted 5-2 last night to reconsider options after listening to over a dozen concerned citizens. 

KBIA

On April 15th the Columbia City Council will vote to pass the Providence Road improvement plan.

Columbia's  city council members have approved funds to purchase an Armored Personnel Carrier for the Columbia Police Department.

The Department plans to replace its current vehicle with the Lenco BearCat, at a cost of about $200,000. Council members approved the appropriation at Monday night's city council meeting.

Columbia Police Chief Ken Burton said it is essential to have such a vehicle in case of gun violence.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The three candidates vying for Columbia’s fourth ward seat have different priority issues and disagreements on governing and budget spending, but what incumbent Daryl Dudley and challengers Ian Thomas and Bill Weitkemper have in common is the desire to make Columbia better and serve its residents.

Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

Karl Skala and Gary Kespohl are very familiar with each other.

Both are squaring off for the Third Ward Council seat of Columbia.

However, this will be the third time in the last three elections they have gone against each other.

City of Columbia finds $1.9 million budget surplus

Mar 19, 2013
columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The new "incentive budgeting" technique has resulted in a $1.9 million surplus in the City of Columbia's budget. City council members discussed Monday ways the money could be spent, including street and sidewalk repairs, the J.W. "Blind" Boone Home renovation and adding more wheelchair accessible entrances.

The council did not vote on any measure, but said it agrees on rewarding the city for saving money.

Columbia city officials are considering upcoming improvements and funding for the Columbia Regional Airport.  The airport was a focal point for discussion at last night's (Monday) city council meeting in Columbia. Council members heard from Mayor Bob McDavid on proposed improvements to the airport and what those changes might mean for the city.  A possible new terminal and funding for the air traffic control tower are under consideration. 

taylor.a / FLICKR

Changes to the Columbia Public School transportation schedules remain under debate. The Columbia Board of Education convened Monday to discuss, among other things, the new three-tier schedule designed to reduce the number of busses and improve the quality of service.

This schedule would push high school start times back back to 9 a.m. Middle schools and some elementary schools start between 7:20 and 7:30 a.m. The rest of elementary schools would begin at 8:20 a.m.

Columbia City Hall
KBIA file photo

Councilwoman Laura Nauser is very familiar with the Columbia City Council and the fifth ward seat she just won in a special election Tuesday.

Nauser previously served on the City Council for six years ending in 2011 until she narrowly won a bid for the fifth ward seat Tuesday night.  She says she ran in this special election because there were council votes she disagreed with while she was out of office.  Nauser emphasized her desire to establish a more uniform approach to government decision making.

Columbia City Hall
KBIA file photo

Columbia Mayor Bob McDavid said the student tradition of driving to and from school campuses has to change; transportation was a key issue at Monday night's Columbia City Council meeting.

Council members discussed transportation options and solutions to increasing transportation problems created by Columbia's growing student population.

McDavid compared Columbia to other college towns in the Midwest like Ames, Iowa and the Champagne-Urbana area of Illinois, saying that those cities succeeded in creating mass transit instead of parking garages nearly 30 years ago.

A second person will be filing for the vacant Ward 5 position on the Columbia City Council.

Lance Cheung for USDA / Flickr

Solar panels could be coming to the city of Columbia’s residential neighborhoods in the next three years.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia City Council approved the purchase of a plot of land, but council members haven’t agreed on what the city will use it for. The city of Columbia is purchasing a two-acre plot of land on Vandiver Drive at US 63. City Manager Mike Matthes says it will cost three hundred thousand dollars.

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