contraception coverage

 

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

New research out of Washington University has found that giving women free birth control does not increase risky sexual behavior.

The analysis included 7,751 St. Louis-area women between the ages of 14 and 45.

It was part of an even larger effort called the Contraceptive CHOICE Project, whose goal is to promote the use of long-term contraceptive methods like intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A federal judge has thrown out a Missouri lawmaker's lawsuit seeking an exemption from contraceptive coverage under the new Affordable Care Act's insurance provisions.

Dan Verbeck / KBIA

Attorney General Chris Koster wants a federal judge to clarify a recent ruling that struck down a Missouri law exempting moral objectors from mandatory birth control insurance coverage.

Courtesy of UC Irvine / Flickr

A federal judge has struck down a Missouri law that directly challenges the so-called contraceptive mandate under the federal health law.

brains the head / Flickr

A federal judge in St. Louis has dismissed a lawsuit challenging the contraception mandate of the federal health care law.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of Frank O'Brien and his company, O'Brien Industrial Holdings LLC of St. Louis, was one of nearly three dozen cases nationally challenging the constitutionality of regulations in the health care law. Among other things, O'Brien, a devout Catholic, claimed the requirement to pay for birth control infringes on his religious beliefs.

Pill bottle on money
images_of_money / Flickr

The Legislature's veto override of a bill expanding religious exemptions from insurance coverage for birth control is the latest example of how Missouri has become a center point in a national debate about pregnancy.

Missouri's law is apparently the first to intentionally contradict an Obama administration policy requiring insurers to cover birth control for women at no additional cost. But the override was closer than expected in the House. One lawmaker acknowledged skipping the vote because he was disgruntled with Missouri Right to Life.