deer

Antler Restrictions Revoked

Nov 2, 2015
Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri deer hunters will not have to worry about shooting a deer whose antlers aren’t big enough. 

Since 2004, hunters have been limited to antlered bucks with at least four points on one side of the bucks rack.  The Missouri Department of Conservation announced it is repealing the previous antler restrictions for a portion of the firearm season from November 14-24. 

Emily Flynn is a deer biologist with the Missouri Department of Conservation.  She says that the restrictions were revoked because of a deadly disease that is spreading. 

Pheasant Hunting Expands Statewide

Oct 12, 2015

  COLUMBIA- The Missouri Department of Conservation announced that it will expand pheasant hunting statewide starting Nov. 1. Hunters in mid-Missouri will now have the opportunity to hunt the popular bird closer to home.

In years past hunting was limited to the area north of I-70, all of St. Charles County and a portion of the Southeastern corner of the state.

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The Missouri Department of Conservation is taking measures to save the deer population in the state.

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A Missouri man is accused of breaking federal law by transporting white-tailed deer to Florida.

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A Missouri lawmaker is again pushing legislation that would shift regulation of farm-raised deer to state agriculture officials. 

  Missouri lawmakers say they're reviving a failed agricultural bill that could help dairy, cattle and crop farmers. 

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Missouri officials have approved tougher regulations for deer ranchers and hunting preserves in an attempt to prevent the spread of disease.

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Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed legislation that would have shifted responsibility for regulating Missouri deer ranches to the Department of Agriculture instead of the Department of Conservation.

MDC seeks input on deer population

May 13, 2014
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When the Conservation Department was started in 1936, there were only a few thousand deer in Missouri.  The 1980s and 90s saw a rapid growth in the state’s deer population, and regulations were set to try to stabilize that growth.Now, the Missouri Department of Conservation wants to know what you think about the state’s deer population.  The Department is hosting public meetings around the state this summer.  Jason Sumners, a resource scientist with the Conservation Department, says the regulations have reduced deer numbers in many places, and it’s time now to assess the situation.  That’s

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November is deer-mating season, and as the deer mate -- drivers are at a higher risk of hitting them. 

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Conservation officials in Missouri want deer hunters to take precautions this fall in order to prevent the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease. CWD cases are so far limited to a containment zone in north central Missouri, with the state’s first documented case occurring three years ago.

Joe Jerek with the state Conservation Department said hunters should wear latex gloves when field-dressing a deer.

A statewide effort to share extra venison taken by deer hunters is bringing in record donations.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the program, called Missouri's Share the Harvest, is on track to distribute 400,000 pounds of donated meat.

The program allows deer hunters to donate the venison when they take deer to food processors. The venison is distributed through regional and local food pantries.

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Missouri's Department of Conservation says hunters took nearly 205,000 deer during November's 11-day firearms season. That's the highest number in four years and 7.7 percent higher than last year.

On this week's show, we'll hear about how the drought is affecting Missouri's deer population, and hear a profile from the Harvest Public Media series My Farm Roots.

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It’s been a while since Jeff Lampe turned on his windshield wipers. But even on a rainy day like this it’s easy to see the toll the drought has taken on his land.

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The Missouri Conservation Department says it has been getting reports of hundreds of dead deer around the state.

The agency says the deer appear to have fallen victim to hemorrhagic disease, which is spread by the bites of the small midge fly.

As of mid-September, the department had received reports of about 2,800 dead deer, with the disease being the suspected cause.

The department says outbreaks of hemorrhagic disease tend to increase during droughts, when deer and flies both congregate near the diminished number of watering spots.

SIWILD / FLICKR

Missouri deer hunters who head out during the fall season are being asked to help the state determine the spread of chronic wasting disease, especially in northern counties.

The Department of Conservation will take tissue samples from Sept. 15 through Jan. from deer killed in Adair, Chariton, Linn, Macon, Randolph and Sullivan counties. Hunters are asked to take their deer to collection points that will be set up in those areas.

Joe Jerek is a spokesperson for the MDC. He says it’s easy for hunters to get samples and it’s crucial to the MDC’s containment efforts.

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The Missouri Conservation Commission has stopped issuing permits for new big-game hunting and breeding facilities that hold white-tailed or mule deer.

Officials say the goal is to help protect deer from fatal chronic wasting disease, a contagious illness that attacks the nervous system.

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Officials have scheduled a series of open houses in north-central Missouri to discuss a disease that's fatal to deer.

The Missouri Department of Conservation will hold six public meetings this month in towns near areas where chronic wasting disease has been found. The events will include presentations on the disease and actions that have been taken to prevent its spread.

Missouri conservation officials are holding a public meeting Saturday to discuss a disease affecting deer in the northern part of the state.

File Image / KBIA News

Missouri's Conservation Department says hunters killed nearly 239,000 deer during the 2011-12 firearms hunting season.