Education

Columbia College
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia College Board of Trustees will vote in April on a proposal to split the college into separate schools.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

The police chief of the University of Missouri in Columbia is retiring after more than four decades with the department. 

Sahir Majid / KBIA

The MU School of Medicine held its annual Match Day event Friday, which is part of the National Residency Matching Program. Graduating seniors receive their residency invitation letters all at once at the event.

Columbia Public Schools

Columbia Public Schools Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education Ben Tilley began his presentation to the Columbia Public Schools Board of Education with a little physics. Every action the board makes in drawing boundary lines, he said, with have an equal, but opposite, reaction.

The University of Missouri student conduct office has suspended a student for making threatening comments toward another student.  The comments were aimed at the author of a letter to the editor that was published in the Maneater. Farah El-Jayyousi wrote a letter to the paper explaining why the movie, “American Sniper” should not be shown on campus.

The student will be suspended until the formal conduct process is complete. 

Amanda Byler / KBIA

Mizzou Students for Life, a local chapter of a national anti-abortion organization, gathered in the MU Student Center Wednesday as a part of a national campaign about Planned Parenthood.  

rik-shaw / FLICKR

 

  A bill to ban Missouri's A+ Scholarship from going to immigrants living in the U.S. illegally has passed the state Senate.

Senators approved the measure 25-8 on Tuesday. The legislation now moves to the House.

The bill would make the state's A+ Scholarship available only to U.S. citizens and permanent residents. The scholarship money pays for two years of free tuition at community colleges.

Republican bill sponsor Sen. Gary Romine says it's unfair to open the scholarship to immigrants in Missouri illegally when money for the program already is stretched thin.

MU College of Arts and Sciences Receives $1 Million Gift

Mar 13, 2015
Chris Yunker / Flickr

  University of Missouri grad Mark Wilkins is giving the MU College of Arts and Sciences a 1 million dollar gift. MU announced Friday that the money will go to create the Mark A. Wilkins Fund for Excellence, and will help retain and recruit professors for the college.

According to the MU News Bureau, the fund could provide money for faculty salary stipends, staff support, teaching materials, and research and travel expenses related to the presentation of research and educational projects.

jeremy.wilburn / Flickr

Columbia Public Schools and that Columbia Missouri National Education Association have not been seeing eye to eye in recent negotiations.

Flickr

A Westminster College chapter of a national fraternity has been suspended indefinitely due to hazing and offensive comments on a social media site. 

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Immigrants living in Missouri illegally couldn't receive scholarships or in-state tuition under a bill approved by the House.

With This Missouri Teacher, The Lesson Is Live

Mar 11, 2015

Each weekday morning, promptly at 7:20 a.m., Robyn King's students go live.

"Are we ready?" King asked on a recent Monday, holding up a single finger pointed at two wide-eyed students sitting at a desk in front of a tripod-mounted iPad. "OK, here we go."

true false film festival
True/False

The True/False Film Fest wrapped up last week, bringing filmgoers from around the world to celebrate the year’s newest documentaries. The festival, which is in its 12th year, brings the intimate and harsh truths of storytelling to life. Although the festival mainly focuses on the films and their directors, local high school students were given the opportunity to dive into one of Columbia's richest traditions. KBIA's Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with the festivals education director Polina Malikin about the importance of the film festival for students. 

umkc.edu

University of Missouri-Kansas City students say they're ultimately satisfied with answers over questions regarding the college's business school, which an audit found it knowingly submitted false data in applying for rankings and awards. 

Look closely.

Buried deep in President Obama's 2016 budget (Page 41) is a proposal to cut up to 30 questions from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

The Obama administration has already done a lot to make the FAFSA easier — if not shorter. Online technology now allows students to skip questions that don't apply to them.

KOMUnews / FLICKR

  The House Education Committee passed a bill on Monday which would require public school activities to be available to home-schooled students in the area.

Wentzville Republican Bryan Spencer says the taxpayers deserve this option.

“With these people paying taxes I think that they should get something for the dollars that they are contributing to the public school system," Spencer said.

Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs.  Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement. 


EXAM: New MU Provost Focuses on Title IX Policies and Teacher Salaries

Mar 2, 2015
Andy Humphrey / KBIA

Newly hired University of Missouri Provost Garnett Stokes comes to her new position with many plans to improve the university’s academic programs.  Stokes led as provost and executive vice president at Florida State University and handled many situations involving Title IX regulations, teacher salaries, and research achievement.  As KBIA’s Andy Humphrey tells us, Stokes believes that she can use her prior experience to help solve various issues at MU.

Patrick Neville was a 15-year-old sophomore at Columbine High School in 1999. He was on his way to a fast food lunch when the shooting started.

Two students, armed with guns and pipe bombs, had stormed the Colorado school, on their way to killing one teacher and 12 students — some were Neville's friends.

Neville, now a Colorado state representative, says many of Columbine's teachers and faculty acted heroically that day.

But, he says, "I truly believe that had some of them had the legal authority to be armed, more of my friends might be with me today."

school buses
Twix / Flickr

  A Missouri judge says the state's membership to a testing company aligned with the national Common Core education standards is illegal and that it shouldn't pay fees to be part of the group.

Columbia Public Schools

  The Columbia School Board appointed Kristi Shinn to be the new principal of Derby Ridge Elementary school this Monday.

Kristi Shinn is currently the principal of Main Street Elementary School in Troy, Mo, and she has 13 years of experience as an elementary principal and seven years as a teacher.

The Derby Ridge Elementary School’s hiring committee included school administrators, teachers and parents, all of who were impressed by Shinn’s rich experiences, said Michelle Baumstark, community relations director of the School Board.

columns at university of missouri
File Photo / KBIA

Peer reviewers from the Higher Learning Commission have been meeting with administrators, faculty and students this week at MU.  

standardized test
albertogp123 / Flickr

The State Board of Education will offer the ACT or the American College Test to all 11th graders in Missouri for free.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central Missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week.

Hickman High School student Shakira Cross recited the poem “Grief” by Elizabeth Barrett Browning as she gestures freely with her hands and arms.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

 

   Nine high school students from Columbia, Jefferson City, Boonville and Osage Beach competed in this year’s central missouri regional Poetry Out Loud competition at the Daniel Boone Regional Library last week. KBIA’s Hope Kirwan talked with the students, their teachers and parents about why this competition is about more than just reciting verse.

 

 

 

 

 

Jefferson City Announces new High School Principal

Feb 19, 2015
Jefferson City Public Schools

Jefferson City Public School’s announced Tuesday that Robert James will be the new principal of Jefferson City High School effective July 1st, 2015.

Kirksville Tigers logo
MSHAA

Kirksville high school teachers are now allowing their students to use cellphones in class. On Jan. 28, the Kirksville Board of Education approved the “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) policy which lets students use personal devices as a learning tool.

Parents have made news recently after being detained for purposefully leaving children on their own, prompting renewed debate about so-called "free-range parenting."

That includes Danielle and Alexander Meitiv, a Silver Spring, Md., couple who are being investigated after they let their children, ages 10 and 6, walk home from a park last month by themselves.

Missouri Military Academy Pilots Digital Textbook Program

Feb 17, 2015
Amazon.com, Inc.

  The Missouri Military Academy is moving towards a digital educational platform via the Kindle Paperwhite. Middle school classrooms have been operating with the new technology since December.

Middle School Director Edsel Baker said the pilot program allows teachers to quickly download new class material at any time, keeping the school curriculum up to date and timely.

Secondary books, or required class novels, can also be downloaded at a reduced price when bought from Amazon via the Kindle Paperwhite, keeping costs minimal for students, among other benefits.

EXAM: MU’s Title IX Policies Cause Headaches and Confusion for Faculty and Staff

Feb 16, 2015
Adam Procter / flickr

In October, University of Missouri Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin sent out a mass email to students, faculty and staff explaining faculty and staff are mandatory reporters of any form of discrimination under new Title IX policies.

For many of these new mandatory reporters, their new responsibilities have caused some confusion and concern. An online training program was launched a few months after the initial announcement to try to help clear the air. But, the training has caused its own confusion and headaches as well.


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