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Three very different stories illustrate the common -- and deepening -- fault line that news, sports, entertainment media and higher education are trying desperately to straddle.   Every word, every video clip, every invited speaker, every programming decision is viewed through the hyper-partisan lens of pro-Trump and anti-Trump activists.  On this week's episode of Views of the News we discuss Sean Spicer, Chelsea Manning and ESPN's Jemele Hill.  Plus a look at the new Ken Burns documentary on the Vietnam War.  

Inviting Spicer to the Emmys

CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

The New York Times reports on the dramatic decline in enrollment at Mizzou in the wake of student protests.  A current student leader cries foul while right-wing media gleefully share the story.  Is there enough context?

The BBC contacted Facebook about flaws in how the social network flags and filters child pornography, and Facebook called the cops on the BBC. Why?

Angus Crawford, BBC: “Facebook failed to remove sexualised images of children

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The world will be watching as President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office Friday. Among the big issues we’re keeping an eye on: what his relationship will be with journalists. We got a glimpse of it during last week’s news conference, in which he lashed out at CNN’s Jim Acosta. Is that the new normal?

How do journalists ring in the New Year?  Megyn Kelly announced she was moving from Fox News to NBC.  CNN's Don Lemon rivaled Mariah Carey for most embarrassing moment by getting progressively more drunk on live TV.  A Washington Post reporter chronicled the death threats he received for his aggressive coverage of Donald Trump.  And lots of us talked about how we could cover the president-elect and other big stories with more clarity and purpose in 2017.  Meanwhile, some big brands tackled Islamophobia in new video ads.

Megyn Kelly says goodbye to Fox News

People who struggle with suicidal thoughts will often reach out to friends and family first. But when our social circle lives online these days, the biggest social media networks grapple with how to intervene and with getting users the right kind of help.

Facebook is the latest social media network to roll out support resources for suicide prevention. The company is now trying to combat suicide by doing what it does best — connecting friends.

Internet connection
Sean MacEntee/Flickr Creative Commons

Intersection on Monday will focus on the issue of Internet (or "net") neutrality — a tussle at the crossroads of law and technology that could end up affecting Americans' wallets.

To prepare you for the show, we've pulled together a short explanation of the topic, including a timeline of key dates.

What is net neutrality?

File/KBIA

Columbia Mayor Bob McDavid said he would like the Columbia Police Officers Association to issue a formal apology after an offensive status update was posted on the organization’s Facebook page this week.  

The Wednesday Facebook status joked about the police department’s possible acquisition of an armored Mercedes— and about the reaction from the “boys in the hood.”  The post has since been taken down.

drought
Kecko / Flickr

Missouri agriculture officials are using social media to share information about this summer's lack of rain, extreme heat and wildfires.

The University of Missouri Extension is encouraging people and groups to post on a Facebook page devoted to the drought. It's the latest effort to use Facebook to respond to disasters.

Facebook pages also were set up after last year's flooding and the tornados in Joplin and Branson.

One Truman State University student was surprised when her private Facebook status went public.

Newscast for February 23, 2012

Feb 23, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

  • A commission set to redraw state senate districts reaches accord.
  • The Missouri House debates Pres. Obama's contraception mandate.
  • Controversy over the privacy of Facebook at Truman State University.