farmer of the future

On mid-sized farms

Jun 21, 2012
Frank Morris / Harvest Public Media

This week, we’ll hear the final installment of Harvest Public Media’s Farmer of the Future series.

Frank Morris / Harvest Public Media

 

A few years ago, things were going smoothly for Eric Neill and his family. Neill was making good money as a construction superintendent for a commercial contractor in Kansas City, traveling the country, running challenging job sites. But he wasn’t satisfied.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we’ll hear the fourth installment of Harvest Public Media’s Farmer of the future series, and hear about the bacteria that live in and on our bodies.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

A surprising thing happens while touring Chris Boeckmann’s turkey farm, where 50,000 birds are grown each year for Cargill Inc.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The farmer of future will grow food and raise animals with tomorrow in mind. They’ll know contributing to the food supply is not enough. If the soil, air and water they use to produce food is damaged, good luck feeding anyone. 

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we’ll hear the third installment of Harvest Public Media’s Farmer of the future series, and revisit a conversation with author Michael Pollan.

On robots and farms

May 31, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

On this week’s show, we’ll learn how robots could be used to assist farmers, and hear about an upcoming astronomical event involving Venus and the sun.

Robots on the farm

May 31, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

There’s always work to be done on the farm, but often it’s the same work day, after day, after day. Parts of the job must feel a bit like an assembly line.

While it’s impossible to automate farming like many manufacturers have automated their assembly lines, using robotic technology on the farm might not be so far off.

Farm robots in the classroom

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll hear about how immigrant populations are filling a gap in agricultural labor.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Sioux County, in northwest Iowa, is known for its Dutch pastries. The landscape is dotted with Lutheran and reform churches.  But today, Catholic churches and tortillerias are creeping into the landscape — signs of the new residents joining this vibrant community.

In Sioux County, as in a scattering of communities across the Midwest, Hispanic immigrants are working in meat processing plants, dairies, egg-laying facilities and hog barns. In fact, the majority of U.S. farm laborers today were born outside the U.S.