flood

Staff Sgt. Christopher Robertson / Missouri National Guard

Missouri education officials say 39 school districts won't need to make up the days they canceled because of flooding.

The waivers the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education granted this week excuse the districts from minimum school-calendar requirements.

Disaster specialists are assessing flood and storm damage across Missouri in the wake of storms and severe flooding.

Gov. Eric Greitens said Wednesday that local, state and federal disaster specialists are working to determine the size and scope of the damage as part of the state's application seeking a federal disaster declaration.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens says two people have died in the weekend flooding across his state.

Greitens said Sunday that additional flooding is expected in the days ahead as rivers crest at historic levels.

So Greitens says he has activated the National Guard, so troops can help cities fill sandbags and prepare for the flooding.

First responders performed 111 evacuations and 135 rescues across Missouri over the weekend.

Flood warnings remain in place for much of Missouri with the heaviest flooding expected in the southern third of the state.

Floodwaters in the St. Louis region have receded, leaving behind an estimated 500,000 tons of debris. Now what?

At a news conference Wednesday, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon outlined “Operation Recovery," a cleanup effort that will be coordinated by the National Guard, with Lt. Col. Grace Link, a civil engineer, in charge. Contracted trucks will help clear debris in flood-damaged areas throughout the St. Louis region, Nixon said.

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says the state's death toll from days of pounding rainfall has risen to 10, and he expects that number to grow.

Nixon told reporters Monday that the majority of the victims drowned after driving into floodwaters.

More Rain, Floods Coming to Central Missouri

Jun 16, 2015
File Photo / KBIA

The next few days in Central Missouri will see more rain and flooding. The National Weather Service predicts 4-6 inches of rain by June 18, and it has issued flood watches and warnings across the state.

The Missouri River has reached over 27 feet in Jefferson City, surpassing the flood stage by 4 feet but not yet breaking the 30-foot levee. Cole County Emergency Management Director Bill Farr said he doesn’t expect the water to reach that height, but he will be prepared in the meantime.

KBIA file photo

For thousands of Missouri residents, flood insurance premiums are about to go up.

People living in flood plains around the nation will soon see a jump in premiums through the National Flood Insurance Program, though a new law softens the blow a bit.

Under a 2012 statute, premiums could have risen from $2,000 annually to $13,000 each year, but residential rate hikes are now limited to an increase of 18 percent a year.