gun rights

The Missouri Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on whether voters knew enough about a constitutional amendment expanding gun rights before it was approved in 2014. 


Many farmers own guns. Yet the right to bear arms fared better than the right to farm in Missouri's recent elections.

Voters approved a constitutional amendment enhancing gun rights by 61 percent of the vote. A constitutional amendment creating a right to farm got just 50.1 percent support.

There was a general city-country divide. The gun and farm measures fared better in rural areas than in bigger cities.

Yet the reason for the closer margin on the farming amendment wasn't solely because of weaker support for it in suburban St. Louis and Kansas City.

zombieite / Flickr


Missouri is now legally obligated to protect residents from any attempts to curtail gun rights. Last night, voters approved Amendment 5 which says in part that the right to bear arms is “an unalienable right and that the state government is obligated to uphold that right”. The measure also covers any ammunition or accessories that are typical to the normal function of the weapon.

When Missourians go to the polls Aug. 5 they will be asked to consider whether or not to amend the state constitution to strengthen the right to own and bear firearms.

Ballot language:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to include a declaration that the right to keep and bear arms is an unalienable right and that the state government is obligated to uphold that right?

What it means:

Gun rights amendment on ballot

Aug 5, 2014
~Steve Z~ / flickr

Missouri voters will decide on Tuesday whether the state will add an amendment to the state constitution that would safeguard the rights of gun owners.

Amendment 5 would declare the right to own firearms, ammunition, and accessories as unalienable. The measure says in part the state of Missouri would be "obligated to uphold these rights and shall under no circumstances decline to protect against their infringement."

Drab Mayko / FLICKR

Kansas City councilmembers have unanimously voted to ban people from openly carrying firearms within city limits.

A Missouri judge has denied a request to stop election officials from distributing absentee ballots for a proposed constitutional amendment dealing with gun rights.

Cole County Judge Jon Beetem rejected a temporary restraining order Wednesday but said he will consider a request to rewrite the ballot summary that voters will see in August.

Beetem heard arguments Wednesday in the lawsuit brought by St. Louis Police Chief Samuel Dotson III and Rebecca Morgan, a member of the Missouri chapter of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Drab Mayko / FLICKR

  The Missouri House has already endorsed legislation that would nullify some federal gun control laws the state considers to be infringements on gun rights.

But today, the Republican-led chamber voted to remove a portion of the bill that could have sent law enforcement officers to jail for knowingly enforcing such laws.

Under previous versions of the measure, federal agents could have faced up to a year in jail and a $1,000 fine. The House bill would only allow people to sue law enforcement for enforcing certain federal laws.