harvest public media

Agriculture
5:37 pm
Thu April 25, 2013

Potato industry banks on 'Linda'

The U.S. Potato Board is spending about $4 million annually on a marketing campaign targeting shoppers.
Credit Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

At a Fort Collins, Colo., grocery store, Kristin Mastre paused for a minute in front a large bin of Russet and red potatoes. She picked out a few handfuls and continued on, her two boys, Carter, 4, and Logan, 7, in tow.

Read more
Health & Wealth Blog
4:30 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Rural Reads: On post offices, Common Core and county health

Every week, KBIA's Health & Wealth Desk curates the week's most interesting (or so we think) articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues. 

Rural post offices in crisis

Read more
Health & Wealth Blog
6:02 pm
Fri March 15, 2013

Rural Reads: On osteopathic physicians and access to insurance

Every Friday, KBIA’s Health and Wealth Desk curates the week’s most interesting (or so we think) articles and reports on rural health, wealth and society issues.

Osteopathic Physicians: An Answer To Rural Health Care Needs?

It’s no secret the U.S. is facing a shortage of primary care physicians – especially in rural areas, which is home to some 20 percent of all Americans, but only has 9 percent of all physicians. Compared to specialized medicine such as surgery and cardiology, primary care does not pay as well – and the average student loan debt for med school graduates is $161,290. Only about 24 percent of MD graduates lean to primary care. That’s not the case with recent osteopathic medicine graduates, though.  

Read more
Agriculture
9:09 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Health insurance unknowns loom for farmers as Affordable Care Act approaches

Marilyn Andersen, who raises angora goats and llamas for wool near Story City, Iowa, is one of many farmers and ranchers entering the individual health insurance marketplace.
Amy Mayer Harvest Public Media

Marilyn Andersen raises angora goats and llamas for wool that she spins and weaves in her studio at Two Cedars Weaving in Story City, Iowa. She also has a part-time job coordinating distribution of local produce through a service called Farm to Folk. Neither effort comes with health insurance.

Read more
Agriculture
6:24 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Seed science pushes toward higher yields

Researchers at DuPont Pioneer’s facility near Des Moines, Iowa, test these varieties of corn.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

At an open house at DuPont Pioneer’s Dallas Center Corn Research Center near Des Moines, Iowa, retired corn breeder Bill Ambrose marveled at the tools available today to do the job he did for nearly 40 years.

Read more
Agriculture
6:10 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

Generic seeds could have a short lifespan

Potted soybean plants line the tables in a research greenhouse at the University of Nebraska Lincoln. Researchers are trying to understand the ways different genes control plant growth.
Grant Gerlock Harvest Public Media

The patent rights on the first genetically modified seeds expire next year, but it’s not clear how the introduction of “generic” seeds fits into the science and business of GM crops.

Read more
Agriculture
7:12 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

Drought takes head start into 2013

An aerial view of farmland affected by the drought in northeastern Colorado in July 2012. Green circles show irrigated crops next to yellowed, dryland wheat fields.
Lance Cheung USDA

 

2012 was a drought year for the record books. It was the warmest year ever recorded in Des Moines, IowaTopeka, Kan., and Columbia, Mo. and the driest ever in Grand Island, Neb. The question is whether 2013 will be any different.

Read more
Business Beat
5:04 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Checkoff beef and fiscal cliff (for now)

Credit File Photo / KBIA

Did you feel that pullback January 1st? That was Congress finally passing a compromise bill to prevent the country from careening off the fiscal cliff. In the early hours of 2013, the Senate passed the bill. And much later that day, the House passed it.

Read more
Agriculture
4:30 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Beef checkoff feud exposes divide within cattle industry

Allen Berry co-owns a cow-calf operation with his wife near Trenton, Mo. Like all other cow-calf operators, Berry pays into a fund that benefits the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board for each animal sold.
Credit Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

This story on the American beef industry is part of a special reporting series from Harvest Public Media. Check out the rest of their stories at harvestpublicmedia.org.

When Allen Berry brought his 11 yearlings to the Green City Livestock Market in central Missouri last month, he paid into a fund that at first blush, seems a bargain.

Read more
Under the Microscope
5:50 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Problematic US horsemeat shows up in Europe

Silky Shark, a racehorse that earned over $100,000 during his racing career.
Courtesy Ken Terpenning

On this week’s show, we’ll hear about problematic US horsemeat showing up in Europe, and hear from one researcher about ways to convince people to lead a healthier lifestyle.

Read more
Science, Health and Technology
5:40 pm
Thu December 20, 2012

Drugged-up horsemeat (from U.S.) showing up in Europe

Silky Shark, a racehorse that earned over $100,000 during his racing career.
Courtesy Ken Terpenning

 

Silky Shark was a beautiful animal and a successful race horse. Over the course of his career he earned over $100,000 for his Kentucky owner. But Silky Shark ended up as meat on someone’s plate – most probably somewhere in Europe.

Silky Shark’s story isn’t unusual. Over 100,000 American horses – race horses, ranch horses, teaching stable horses - are eaten abroad every year.

Read more
Under the Microscope
6:35 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

On fuel and fellowships

Equipment innovations such as this corn stover baler have helped make harvesting of biomass more practical.
Amy Mayer Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we’ll hear about changes in the ethanol industry and talk to the recipient of a prestigious science fellowship.

Read more
Agriculture
5:44 pm
Thu December 13, 2012

Cellulosic ethanol is coming, future uncertain

Corn stover, baled in the field after the grain has been harvested, provides feedstock for cellulosic ethanol.
Amy Mayer Harvest Public Media

About a decade ago, concerns about energy independence, greenhouse gas emissions and the need to boost rural economies led Congress to launch policies in support of biofuels  – corn ethanol, most notably. But the idea was that eventually more U.S.-produced fuel would be cellulosic – derived from corn residue, wheat straw or other biomass.

Read more
Agriculture
5:38 pm
Thu November 29, 2012

In the ag census even the smallest farms count

A head of broccoli ready to be picked in late November at Jones Produce near Crete, Neb.
Grant Gerlock Harvest Public Media

The U.S. Department of Agriculture updates its ag census every five years and is preparing to send farmers new surveys in December. One trend to watch is the growing number of small farms. They are easy to miss and some would rather not be counted.

Read more
Harvest Public Media
11:21 am
Thu November 22, 2012

The local-global food connection

“We need to produce as much to feed the world as we can, but also people like to eat locally grown foods, too, so there’s a case for both sides of agriculture,” says Greg Rinehart, a farmer in Boone County, Iowa.
Amy Mayer Harvest Public Media

The United States is the world’s leading producer and exporter of corn, which is used as livestock feed to support the increasing demand for meat in China, India and other countries with growing middle classes.

Read more

Pages