harvest public media

Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

Along a vast stretch of the Missouri River, the floodwaters that ravished homes, businesses and farms last year are not a distant memory.

Grant Gerlock / for Harvest Public Media

This week on the show: an enzyme factory aims to be a big part of the ethanol industry, and a business incubator in Columbia lands a state tax credit.

Enzyme factory mixes into ethanol's future

Jun 27, 2012
Grant Gerlock / NET

Inside a new facility in Blair, Neb., north of Omaha, a gleaming maze of steel tubes connect a line of giant fermentation tanks that will cultivate some of the most advanced biotechnology in the ethanol industry.

Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

A surprising thing happens while touring Chris Boeckmann’s turkey farm, where 50,000 birds are grown each year for Cargill Inc.

Sandhya Dirks / Harvest Public Media

A war over words is part of a bigger struggle between agriculture interests and their critics. Plus, a national report looks at agriculture research grants from private corporations to land grant Universities, including MU.

Is the agriculture industry being bullied?

Jun 13, 2012
Sandhya Dirks / Harvest Public Media

There is a culture war raging in the heartland. It’s not about abortion or religion or gay marriage, it’s about how food is produced in this country.

As in any war, language is playing a big role. Take, for instance, the way Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad defended the beef product that came to be known as “pink slime.”

“It’s just tragic that people use smear language against products,” Branstad said. “We would never let people smear somebody because of who/what they look like, or their race, or their religion.”

On robots and farms

May 31, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

On this week’s show, we’ll learn how robots could be used to assist farmers, and hear about an upcoming astronomical event involving Venus and the sun.

Robots on the farm

May 31, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

There’s always work to be done on the farm, but often it’s the same work day, after day, after day. Parts of the job must feel a bit like an assembly line.

While it’s impossible to automate farming like many manufacturers have automated their assembly lines, using robotic technology on the farm might not be so far off.

Farm robots in the classroom

Calm before the corn

May 30, 2012
Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

Corn has been good to farmers. Helping fuel a boom in the ag sector. And as this year’s record corn forecast indicates, Midwestern farmers can’t seem to plant enough of the grain. Even with concerns growing about the effectiveness of today’s high-tech genetically engineered seeds, farmers aren’t backing down.

Clay Masters / Iowa Public Radio

This week on the show: Columbia’s City Manager talks about the direction of the local economy. Plus, farmers continue to plant corn despite failing efforts to combat rootworm.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll hear about how immigrant populations are filling a gap in agricultural labor.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Sioux County, in northwest Iowa, is known for its Dutch pastries. The landscape is dotted with Lutheran and reform churches.  But today, Catholic churches and tortillerias are creeping into the landscape — signs of the new residents joining this vibrant community.

In Sioux County, as in a scattering of communities across the Midwest, Hispanic immigrants are working in meat processing plants, dairies, egg-laying facilities and hog barns. In fact, the majority of U.S. farm laborers today were born outside the U.S.

A most unusual planting season

May 16, 2012
Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

On this bright spring morning at Blackbird Bend, along the Missouri River, the scene is a little odd.  A 24-row corn planter is brushing over the tops of a stunning winter wheat crop, 12 inches high.

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

A Columbia lawyer is utilizing a federal program to try to bring so-called, “immigrant investors” to Mid Missouri. Plus, Harvest Public Media reports on the lasting effects of last year’s flooding.

Business Beat: Costly Wind Gusts for Farmers

May 9, 2012
NET News

This week: Farmers looking to have a record book corn harvest. Plus, find out how wind gusts can cost farmers a ton of money.

NET News

For many Midwesterners, wind is an occasional nuisance. For farmers, though, the wind’s impact can be huge — drying out crops and eroding topsoil. Gusts big and small also complicate the application of chemicals, and that can be particularly costly.

Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

This week: Harvest Public Media takes an in depth look into rural commodity brokers, and the tug of war battle between MF Global and rural farmers, and a look back on the store Cool Stuff.

Rural brokers pick up pieces after MF Global crisis

May 2, 2012
Jeremy Bernfeld / Harvest Public Media

When futures trading firm MF Global went bankrupt at the end of October, regulators discovered $1.6 billion in customer funds missing, much of it belonging to Midwest farmers and ranchers. But MF Global clients aren’t the only ones hurting in farm country.

Eva Dou / KBIA

This week: Columbia’s biggest export to China isn’t corn, soybeans, or any manufactured product.  It’s scrap metal.  In fact trade experts are calling Columbia’s export “waste and scrap.” Plus, find out how one farmer is still shifting through the aftermath after losing hundreds of acres of farmland.

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Scott Olson is getting ready to plant corn and soybeans, but he wonders if anything will grow.

Trying to keep rural towns alive

Apr 19, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

This week on the show, people in rural areas are trying to figure out how to keep youth – and jobs – in their areas. Plus, college graduates could have a better opportunity getting a job than graduates have in the past.

Trying to keep rural towns alive

Apr 19, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

This week on the show, people in rural areas are trying to figure out how to keep youth – and jobs – in their areas. Plus, college graduates could have a better opportunity getting a job than graduates have in the past.

Rural America is fighting for its survival

Apr 18, 2012
WenDee Rowe LaPlant / Kansas Sampler Foundation

The 2010 Census found that the share of people in rural areas over the past decade fell to 16 percent, passing the previous low of 20 percent in 2000. The rural population is aging, and young people are moving away.

Railroad Looking to Roll Again

Apr 11, 2012
Dean Borg / Harvest Public Media

It’s been seven years since folks around Forest City, Iowa, have heard a train whistle on the nearby tracks. But Iowa Northern locomotives will soon be switching railcars alongside the towering grain silos at the town’s co-op elevator.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

Many dairymen are calling the government price support system broken, but just how to fix it isn't clear. There's debate over how much the government should step in to help in tough times and as to what degree it should let the free market govern.  

Business Beat: Govenors Back Beef Trimmings

Apr 6, 2012
AP

This week: U.S. farmers made over 98 billion dollars last year, and consumers are upset about "lean beef trimmings," but governors are trying to diffuse the situation.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week: Another update in the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, and climate changes doesn't ease troubles for farmers. 

Governors Back Beef Trimmings

Apr 4, 2012
AP

By Sandhya Dirks

The consumer uproar over “pink slime” has now got the beef industry roaring back.

Harum Helmy / KBIA

How do consumers make decisions about what they consume? And, how are the various stakeholders attempting to shape those thoughts about food? Host Reuben Stern spoke with four experts with diverse views about the messages and motives behind these controversies in this special Intersection event, 

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll explore how some towns are dealing with poor access to affordable food. Plus, an interview with President Obama's principal environmental advisor.

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