hosni mubarak

Wikimedia Commons/Kremlin.ru

Egypt will hold a presidential election at the end of this month. But there’s little drama about who will actually win.

President Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi, who led a 2013 coup against the country’s first democratically-elected leader, is expected to be handily re-elected.

That’s because el-Sissi’s government has arrested or intimidated all viable potential opponents. The president’s only opponent is virtually unknown – and was actually an outspoken supporter of el-Sissi until just hours before the candidate registration deadline. Yet despite a wave of repression, there are signs of divisions in the security forces that buttress el-Sissi's rule.

On this edition of Global Journalist a look at Egypt’s staged election, and what it may mean for its future and its status as a key U.S. ally in the Middle East.

Amr Nabil / AP Images

Egypt is an ancient civilization with a newborn democracy.  So, after revolutionaries toppled dictator Hosni Mubarak, growing pains were expected. The top generals have been ruling the country for six decades, and they weren’t about to give up power without a fight.