infrastructure

Columbia's First Ward City Council candidates joined us to share their priorities. The election is April 4. Candidates discussed their views on housing, infrastructure, community policing and social equity.

 

 


Potential Fuel Tax Increase Sparks Controversy

Feb 24, 2017
Andrew Pilewski / KBIA

Missourians could pay more at the gas pump to offset income tax cuts, according to a bill proposed in the Missouri House.

The House read a bill Thursday that would cut income taxes for the top tax bracket in Missouri while raising fuel taxes to offset the cuts. These funds would then be used to finance infrastructure improvements in the state.

Bill sponsor Bart Korman (R) thinks that this bill is a solution to funding road work in Missouri.

Rep. Chris Kelly
KBIA

 

   Last night was the first meeting of the Mayor’s Task Force on Infrastructure, a group approved by the city council in July to help guide the city in addressing the infrastructure problems created by the growth of downtown.

The first meeting was mostly housekeeping: introductions and basic structure for future meetings. But the group also began to set protocol for its assignment.

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

First Ward Columbia City Council Member Ginny Chadwick announced Friday her opposition to a new referendum petition stated to be in favor of repealing improper downtown development.

File / KBIA

The government of Columbia is continuing to try and clear up questions about the future of the city.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Missouri) Tuesday criticized state lawmakers for failing to pass a transportation bill, while previewing federal legislation to improve the nation’s infrastructure. KSMU’s Scott Harvey has details.

McCaskill said the U.S. transportation system is deteriorating, especially in Missouri, calling the state’s $600 million construction budget to oversee 33,000 miles of roadways a “recipe for disaster.”

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

highway
Dreamstime

Civil engineers say Missouri's infrastructure gets only a C-minus.

The regional chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers released the letter grade Wednesday. It is part of a report card that evaluated the state's aviation, bridges, dams, drinking water, energy, inland waterways, levees, railroads, roads, schools and wastewater. Each sub-category also received a grade.