intersection

Micah Walker

  This week on Intersection, we take a look at the Missouri Department of Conservation's efforts to reintroduce elk into Missouri, and we discuss the poaching of a bull elk in December. Our guests this week are resource scientist for the MU Department of Conservation Barbara Keller, State Wildlife Veterinarian for the MDC Kelly Straka, MDC agent Brad Hadley and elk program manager for the MDC David Hasenbeck . Listen to the full story or check out clips from selected interviews below.

Listen to the full story.


KBIA

  On this week's Intersection, we are talking about autism spectrum disorder and the Autism Mentor Program at MU. Our guests are UM student Chris Brown and licensed psychologist and creator of the Autism Mentor Program Colton Miller. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below.

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Michael Shannon Michael Shannon John is the story of children trying to discover who there father really was. Intersection talked with Michael Shannon Michael Shannon John director Chelsea McMullen about the film after it showed at the 2016 True/False Film Fest.

 

Intersection's host, Sara Shahriari, spoke with Manu Gerosa, the director of "Between Sisters," a film about Italian sisters and their struggle to share a long-held secret. The documentary is about Gerosa's aunt and mother, and showed to full houses during the True/False Film Fest.


Courtesy of The State Historical Society of Missouri

  This week we're exploring African American history in Missouri, with a special emphasis on Columbia. Our guests are University of Missouri-Kansas City professor and historian Diane Mutti Burke, and MU doctoral student in history Mary Beth Brown. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below. 

Listen to the entire show.

As recently as the late 1950s, downtown Columbia looked very different. Here MU doctoral student in history Mary Beth Brown talks about the former African American neighborhood of Cemetery Hill, which was torn down to make way for parking lots and businesses.


A photo of Simon Tatum's drawing
Simon Tatum

This week we're talking with MU student artists. These young people create with paint and fabric and even barbed wire. And for them making art is really serious work and as well as a passion. We learned about our guests through the University's Undergraduate Visual Art and Design Showcase, which took place for the first time on campus in January. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below. 

Listen to the entire show.


a photo of a low intervention delivery suite
MU Women's and Children's Hospital

  

This week we’re talking about the new low intervention delivery suites at the University of Missouri Women's and Children's Hospital. Our guests are mother Jill Markijohn, who was the first person to use the suites when they opened in November, Doctor Courtney Barnes, the medical director of the low intervention birth program, and certified nurse midwife Lori Anderson who works at Women’s and Children’s Hospital.  To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and listen to portions of our interviews below.

Listen to the entire show. 


  This week on Intersection, we're talking with two local legislators about  major issues at play in the Missouri General Assembly's 2016 session.Our guests are District 45 Democratic Rep. Kip Kendrick, and District 44 Republican Rep. Caleb Rowden. Our conversations with Kendrick and Rowden touch on issues including ethics reform,  healthcare, highways, UM funding and college loan debt. To learn more, listen to our entire show, or read and  listen to portions of our interviews after the jump.


lipcan3/Flickr

 This week on Intersection, the focus is on meat. We're talking about shifts in meat consumption and why they happen, meat production right here in Missouri, and consumer interest in grass-fed beef and sustainable agriculture. This week's guests are KBIA and Harvest Public Media reporter Kristofor Husted, MU professor of rural sociology Mary Hendrickson, and author and rancher Nicolette Hahn Niman, whose most recent book is "Defending Beef, the Case for Sustainable Meat Production."


Bram Sable-Smith/KBIA

University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe resigned Monday, a major move in a school year defined by a level of activism and student mobilization that is not often seen at Mizzou. Later the same day MU Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from his position, and transferring to a research focused role.

Every story is a long story with a deep history and many layers, but this chapter began on October 10. A group of 11 African American students calling themselves Concerned Student 1950 blocked the homecoming parade, linking arms and forming a line in front of Wolfe’s car. They were protesting racism and discrimination at the university. 

Over the course of the next month protests, walkouts and a hunger strike dominated campus news. On Monday, as major changes were underway, Intersection reporters fanned out across campus to bring you these voices and stories from people including Michael Sam, Jonathan Butler, Tim Wolfe and Mary Ratliff, among many others.  


KBIA

 This week on Intersection, we're talking about graduate students at the University of Missouri here in Columbia. So what’s going on in this part of the university world? That’s what we’re exploring today with our guests, who are Kristofferson Culmer of the Forum on Graduate Rights, Rebecca Smith of KBIA’s Health and Wealth Desk, Matt McCune of the Graduate Professional Council, Professor Earnest Perry of the Missouri School of Journalism and Eric Scott of the Coalition of Graduate Workers.


Sara Shahriari / KBIA

On this week's Intersection, the focus is on native plants and our environment – with a special emphasis on the relationship between milkweed and monarch butterflies. Host Sara Shahriari explores efforts to preserve and create native plant habitats in our own backyards, and beyond. Our guests are Chip Taylor of Monarch Watch, Carol Davit of the Missouri Prairie Foundation, Pete Millier of the Mizzou Botanic Garden and Mervin Wallace of Missouri Wildflowers Nursery. 


Sara Shahriari/KBIA

On this week’s edition of Intersection, we delve into the rich history, sweet sounds and savory flavors of the Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival. Our host Sara Shariari talks with Aarik Danielsen, features editor of the Columbia Daily Tribune, and learns about the stories behind the blues with musicians Pat 'Mother Blues' Cohen, Albert White, Big Ron Hunter, Ardie Dean, Lil' Joe Burton and Nashid Abdul, who perform with the Music Maker Blues Revue. Segments on some of the event’s food vendors and  festival-goers round out the show. 


Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen. But in order to solve the problem of obesity in Missouri, we need to first understand why it exists. Intersection host Ryan Famuliner will lead the discussion of some of the physical, cultural, and even political events that have brought on what is considered by many to be a public health crisis in our state. 

Join us this Tuesday at 7pm for “Missouri: State of Obesity,” a live taping of KBIA’s talk show Intersection. 

The United States Veterans Health Administration has recently been under national scrutiny, after reports that veterans were on waiting lists at some VA hospitals for more than 30 days… in some cases, dozens of people had died while still on waiting lists to receive care. Moreover, there’s been evidence of efforts at some hospitals to hide evidence of those long waiting lists. Congress is discussing the issue, and the Veterans Affairs Secretary resigned last month.

For years now the state of Missouri’s infrastructure has been a concern for public officials, politicians and Missourians on the whole.The Missouri Department of Transportation and state legislators have come up with a way to combat the department’s shrinking budget, but it’s up to Missouri voters to approve it. Amendment 7 will be on the August ballot: it’s a three quarter cent statewide sales tax increase on everything except groceries and medicine.

Some believe that learning and listening to music, particularly classical music, at a young age is tied to success in the future. 

In Columbia, there are many efforts to get children interested in classical music: multiple avenues for music education, and even classical music performances in town targeted at kids.

Today on Intersection, we’ll talk about how young people in Mid-Missouri are exposed to these influences, and about some of the challenges in reaching them.

Guests:

In Columbia, more than 8 percent of the population is foreign-born, compared with just under 4 percent on average in the rest of Missouri. In Columbia Public Schools, there are 61 different languages spoken amongst the students in the English Language Learning programs. Today on Intersection we’re talking about mid-Missouri’s international communities. Why is Columbia more culturally diverse than other parts of the Midwest? What is life like in Columbia for people from around the world, and how does their presence affect the town as a whole?

KBIA's Intersection

It’s been nearly 150 years since the close of the US Civil War, but the effects, and some of the arguments, continue to be felt today. Two years ago, a petition allowing Texas to secede from the US received over 100,000 online signatures, and prompted a response from the White House. Here in Missouri, lawmakers last year pushed a bill to nullify all federal gun control laws in the state. It ultimately failed, but that hasn’t stopped legislators from introducing similar legislation in this session.

The internet age has brought to us the ability to get large amounts of information, from across the globe, delivered to our fingertips within seconds. This access provides us with a powerful amount of interconnectedness, and information (not to mention entertainment!). But how should this access and interconnectedness be distributed? Should it be available to everyone equally, or should big companies - like Netflix and Amazon - be restricted because of the amount of data they are streaming? What does all of this mean for the economy, democracy and those of us just trying to stream movies at home?

Internet connection
Sean MacEntee/Flickr Creative Commons

Intersection on Monday will focus on the issue of Internet (or "net") neutrality — a tussle at the crossroads of law and technology that could end up affecting Americans' wallets.

To prepare you for the show, we've pulled together a short explanation of the topic, including a timeline of key dates.

What is net neutrality?

It’s been a big couple of years for marijuana legalization efforts around the country, with states like Colorado and Washington legalizing the recreational use of cannabis.

Here in Missouri, Rep. Chris Kelly (D-Columbia) introduced a bill in January that, if passed, would create a legal framework to grow and possess marijuana in Missouri.

Photo provided by Sasha's family

A recent report from ESPN's newsmagazine Outside the Lines criticizes the University of Missouri and its athletic department for failing to intervene in the events surrounding an alleged sexual assault against student athlete Sasha Menu Courey in February 2010.

In his opening address at the start of the legislative session last week, House Speaker Tim Jones highlighted “right to work” legislation as one of his priorities this year.  

KBIA

As 2013 comes to a close, we’ve looked back on this year’s crop of Intersection shows as a way to get a grasp on the top stories of the year. We highlighted them in a special hour-long year-end show that you can listen to here:

But if you don’t have an hour to spare at the moment, here are some the bits and pieces.

Crime in Columbia, an effort to get more police officers, and why some of the officers we have now are unhappy

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

  Money is speech. That is what the Supreme Court decided in Buckley v. Valeo (1976), which upheld limits on campaign contributions.

Amelia-Jane / Flickr

  Even though Columbia is a relatively small city, it is full of published writers. On Intersection this week, local authors Keija Parssinen, Marlene Lee and Alex George told us why they think Columbia is such a writer’s haven.

What is the ‘gun show loophole’?

May 8, 2013
KBIA

  Recently, federal legislation that would have expanded background checks on gun purchasers and put a cap on magazine capacity, among other measures, failed in the Senate.

chuybenitez / Flickr

This one's a fun one. The Missouri State Senate grilled the Department of Revenue over whether the state agency (which oversees the DMV) made copies of Concealed Carry Licenses and sent them to the federal government. What started as a kind of weird, bureaucratic witch hunt became a lot more interesting--turns out they actually did it!  But why would the DMV send these documents to the higher ups.  And is it as illegal as it sounds?

CoMo Explained breaks it down in the podcast:  

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