intersection

Obesity is the number one public health issue in Missouri – it affects more than 30% of adults and nearly one in seven children between the ages of ten and seventeen. But in order to solve the problem of obesity in Missouri, we need to first understand why it exists. Intersection host Ryan Famuliner will lead the discussion of some of the physical, cultural, and even political events that have brought on what is considered by many to be a public health crisis in our state. 

Join us this Tuesday at 7pm for “Missouri: State of Obesity,” a live taping of KBIA’s talk show Intersection. 

The United States Veterans Health Administration has recently been under national scrutiny, after reports that veterans were on waiting lists at some VA hospitals for more than 30 days… in some cases, dozens of people had died while still on waiting lists to receive care. Moreover, there’s been evidence of efforts at some hospitals to hide evidence of those long waiting lists. Congress is discussing the issue, and the Veterans Affairs Secretary resigned last month.

For years now the state of Missouri’s infrastructure has been a concern for public officials, politicians and Missourians on the whole.The Missouri Department of Transportation and state legislators have come up with a way to combat the department’s shrinking budget, but it’s up to Missouri voters to approve it. Amendment 7 will be on the August ballot: it’s a three quarter cent statewide sales tax increase on everything except groceries and medicine.

Some believe that learning and listening to music, particularly classical music, at a young age is tied to success in the future. 

In Columbia, there are many efforts to get children interested in classical music: multiple avenues for music education, and even classical music performances in town targeted at kids.

Today on Intersection, we’ll talk about how young people in Mid-Missouri are exposed to these influences, and about some of the challenges in reaching them.

Guests:

In Columbia, more than 8 percent of the population is foreign-born, compared with just under 4 percent on average in the rest of Missouri. In Columbia Public Schools, there are 61 different languages spoken amongst the students in the English Language Learning programs. Today on Intersection we’re talking about mid-Missouri’s international communities. Why is Columbia more culturally diverse than other parts of the Midwest? What is life like in Columbia for people from around the world, and how does their presence affect the town as a whole?

KBIA's Intersection

It’s been nearly 150 years since the close of the US Civil War, but the effects, and some of the arguments, continue to be felt today. Two years ago, a petition allowing Texas to secede from the US received over 100,000 online signatures, and prompted a response from the White House. Here in Missouri, lawmakers last year pushed a bill to nullify all federal gun control laws in the state. It ultimately failed, but that hasn’t stopped legislators from introducing similar legislation in this session.

The internet age has brought to us the ability to get large amounts of information, from across the globe, delivered to our fingertips within seconds. This access provides us with a powerful amount of interconnectedness, and information (not to mention entertainment!). But how should this access and interconnectedness be distributed? Should it be available to everyone equally, or should big companies - like Netflix and Amazon - be restricted because of the amount of data they are streaming? What does all of this mean for the economy, democracy and those of us just trying to stream movies at home?

Internet connection
Sean MacEntee/Flickr Creative Commons

Intersection on Monday will focus on the issue of Internet (or "net") neutrality — a tussle at the crossroads of law and technology that could end up affecting Americans' wallets.

To prepare you for the show, we've pulled together a short explanation of the topic, including a timeline of key dates.

What is net neutrality?

It’s been a big couple of years for marijuana legalization efforts around the country, with states like Colorado and Washington legalizing the recreational use of cannabis.

Here in Missouri, Rep. Chris Kelly (D-Columbia) introduced a bill in January that, if passed, would create a legal framework to grow and possess marijuana in Missouri.

Photo provided by Sasha's family

A recent report from ESPN's newsmagazine Outside the Lines criticizes the University of Missouri and its athletic department for failing to intervene in the events surrounding an alleged sexual assault against student athlete Sasha Menu Courey in February 2010.

In his opening address at the start of the legislative session last week, House Speaker Tim Jones highlighted “right to work” legislation as one of his priorities this year.  

KBIA

As 2013 comes to a close, we’ve looked back on this year’s crop of Intersection shows as a way to get a grasp on the top stories of the year. We highlighted them in a special hour-long year-end show that you can listen to here:

But if you don’t have an hour to spare at the moment, here are some the bits and pieces.

Crime in Columbia, an effort to get more police officers, and why some of the officers we have now are unhappy

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

  Money is speech. That is what the Supreme Court decided in Buckley v. Valeo (1976), which upheld limits on campaign contributions.

Amelia-Jane / Flickr

  Even though Columbia is a relatively small city, it is full of published writers. On Intersection this week, local authors Keija Parssinen, Marlene Lee and Alex George told us why they think Columbia is such a writer’s haven.

What is the ‘gun show loophole’?

May 8, 2013
KBIA

  Recently, federal legislation that would have expanded background checks on gun purchasers and put a cap on magazine capacity, among other measures, failed in the Senate.

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This one's a fun one. The Missouri State Senate grilled the Department of Revenue over whether the state agency (which oversees the DMV) made copies of Concealed Carry Licenses and sent them to the federal government. What started as a kind of weird, bureaucratic witch hunt became a lot more interesting--turns out they actually did it!  But why would the DMV send these documents to the higher ups.  And is it as illegal as it sounds?

CoMo Explained breaks it down in the podcast:  

What does immigration look like in mid-Missouri?

May 1, 2013
Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this month, a “Gang of Eight” bipartisan senators introduced an immigration bill that would grant low-skilled immigrant workers the opportunity to stay in the United States legally without a green card, among other reforms. Called “W-visas,” these visas would allow immigrants to fill positions that don’t require bachelor’s degrees for three years.

Null Value / Flickr

If you’re a crime show junkie, you’re probably well-acquainted with Elliot Stabler’s temper (NSFW language), Jimmy McNulty’s attitude and Horatio Caine’s shades . But do you know how violent crimes really get solved?

Four things you don’t know about college costs

Mar 7, 2013
File / KBIA

Annual tuition hikes over the past five years have made some Mizzou students question whether college is really worth the price tag. However, Nikki Krawitz, MU’s vice president for finance and administration, said the 2.3 percent per year rises in tuition are pretty reasonable compared to the 6 percent of colleges in surrounding states, according to the MU website.

The True/False film festival happens 'in the slash'

Mar 1, 2013
True False Film Festival sign
TrueFalseFilmFestival / Flickr

Catch all of KBIA's filmmaker interviews for this year's True/False Film Festival. Read True/False Conversations or listen to them through iTunes.

The world Paul Sturtz and David Wilson have spent 10 years creating started with the schism between reality and fiction.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.