john diehl

Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

  Special elections have been scheduled to replace three Missouri lawmakers who resigned.

Jay Nixon on Tuesday announced elections will be held Nov. 3.

One vacancy comes after former Republican House Speaker John Diehl, of Town and Country, resigned in May. He admitted to exchanging sexually suggestive text messages with an intern.

Democratic Rep. Kevin McManus resigned after his election to the Kansas City City Council. Independence Republican Rep. Noel Torpey left office in December to take a job with a group that has lobbied the Legislature on utility issues.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

Missouri Senate leaders have approved a workplace policy book that includes steps for dealing with allegations of harassment.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

A group has been formed to review the Missouri House's intern policy after the former speaker admitted to exchanging sexually suggestive texts with an intern.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has hired a lawyer in response to a "workplace harassment complaint."

A document obtained on May 26 by The Associated Press shows the Senate hired the attorney on May 7, 2015.

The legal fee agreement didn't give any details in regards to the complaint, but Minority Leader Joe Keaveny said the Senate is conducting an internal investigation. He declined to comment further.

Jim Nowogrocki of the St. Louis-based Weiss Attorneys at Law will be paid $270 an hour for legal counsel and advice. Senator Keaveny, D- St. Louis, also works at the same firm. 

An investigation by the Missouri Senate and the University of Central Missouri appears to be underway into whether there was inappropriate treatment of another Missouri legislative intern, although there has been no official confirmation.

(Updated 11 a.m. Friday, May 15) Missouri Rep. Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, was elected and sworn in as new House speaker Friday, and swiftly got the House back to the business at hand — passing bills in the final hours of a surreal last week of session.

"This is not the time for speeches,'' Richardson said, ending tumultuous applause from the packed chamber. "This is a time to get back to work."

Updated 1:40 p.m. Thurs, May 14: Missouri House Speaker John Diehl, R-Town and Country, has announced he's resigning as speaker and as a member of the Missouri House.

His statement was issued less than 28 hours after news broke that he had been exchanging sexually salacious texts with a college-age female intern earlier this spring.

Diehl's statement does not say, however, when he will step down. The General Assembly's legislative session officially ends at 6 p.m. Friday. State Rep. Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, told reporters the House's GOP caucus will select a new speaker tonight.

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The Kansas City Star is reporting that electronic messages suggest Missouri House Speaker John Diehl had a sexually charged relationship with a Capitol intern.

The newspaper released screenshots Wednesday that it said showed flirtatious discussions between Diehl and the college freshman that were sometimes sexually suggestive. The Star said the screenshots show Diehl's business cellphone number.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Missouri's Republican House speaker is proposing a number of changes to how traffic violations are handled to address concerns raised by the fatal police shooting in Ferguson.

On this special edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, House Speaker John Diehl, R-Town and Country, joins St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies to talk about the passage of “right to work” legislation in the Missouri. 

The bill in question – sponsored by Rep. Eric Burlison, R-Springfield – would bar unions and employers from requiring all workers to join a union and pay union fees, if a majority votes to organize. It passed the Missouri House on Thursday with 92 "yes" votes, which falls short of the majority needed to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s veto.

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Republican floor leader John Diehl is hoping to add the statewide lottery to the 2016 ballot for a revote he announced Wednesday. Diehl wants to give the public an opportunity to reconsider the value of the lottery and its relationship with the public school system.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is raising new concerns that an income tax cut passed by the Legislature could have "cataclysmic" consequences for state revenues.

The Democratic governor said Tuesday that the bill could eliminate taxes on all income over $9,000, punching a $4.8 billion hole in the state budget.

Republican legislative leaders called Nixon's assertion "ridiculous," ''absurd" and "laughable."

Nixon did not veto the bill Tuesday but has indicated he will do so.

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri House Majority Leader John Diehl is promising to raise money for the Republican cause — not his personal political aspirations — if colleagues nominate him as the next House speaker.

File / KBIA

A leadership competition is brewing within the Republican caucus that has controlled the Missouri House for the past decade.

Caleb Jones, of California, Mo., said Monday he is running for House speaker. That top leadership post also is being sought by current House Majority Leader John Diehl, of St. Louis County.

Republicans now hold a veto-proof majority in the House. Current House Speaker Tim Jones is barred by term limits from seeking re-election in November 2014 to the House.

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Legislation requiring voters to show photo ID at polling places is scheduled for debate in the Missouri House.
House Majority Leader John Diehl said he expects a proposed constitutional amendment mandating photo ID and a bill implementing the rule to be taken up on the House floor this week.

Republicans argue the measure is needed to cut down on voter fraud. Democrats contend the photo ID requirement is aimed at disenfranchising voters.