Missouri's transportation director says a lane closure on an Interstate 70 bridge is one symptom of problems arising from a funding shortfall.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

The Missouri House of Representatives is considering a bill that will increase the maximum weight limits for trucks carrying livestock across state highways.

Today Paul Pepper chats with LIZ SCHIMDT, League of Women Voters, about "Too Many Roads and Bridges; Too Little Funding." Do you have an opinion? MoDOT will be at an informational session TODAY at noon at Hy-Vee South in Columbia. At [4:08] JONI WEINBAUM and LAURA MORRIS display their finest southern hospitality while talking about Capital City Players' latest production, "Southern Hospitality!" It opens this Friday in Jefferson City. February 17, 2015

Missouri Department of Transportation

Missouri's director of transportation Dave Nichols will step down at the beginning of May.


The state's top transportation official has proposed fully maintaining only one-quarter of Missouri's highways because of a funding shortfall. 

Missouri Department of Transportation

The Missouri Department of Transportation is using a nearly $1 million federal grant to apply a surface treatment that is designed to reduce stopping distance and loss of control.

Andrew Magill / Flickr

Jurors have awarded $850,000 to a woman who alleged she was subjected to age and sex discrimination by the Missouri Department of Transportation.

MoDOT plans bridge replacements

Sep 12, 2014

MoDOT is spending 115,000 dollars to aerial map Interstate 70 in Columbia to collect data for a bridge project. Central District Design Engineer Natalie Roark says the money for the project is designated in its budget.

“The money for performing the work has been identified in the statewide transportation improvement plan for completing the preliminary design work on the project, so it’s both federal and state transportation dollars,” Roark said.

Missouri transportation leaders are looking to regroup following voters' overwhelming rejection of a proposed  sales tax to fund road and bridge improvements on Tuesday.

Despite supporters spending millions, the measure lost by roughly 58 percent to 41 percent. And it lost across the state -- in St. Louis, St. Louis County, the Kansas City area and even in rural parts of the state. In St. Louis and St. Louis County, the measure went down by a 2-to-1 margin.

Shelby Mann / KBIA

MoDOT is holding public comment sessions to gather feedback on a proposed transportation tax in Missouri.

The proposed Amendment 7 introduces a three-quarter cent sales tax that would fund transportation projects over a 10 year time period from 2015 to 2025. Voters will decide on the August fifth primary election ballot.

For years now the state of Missouri’s infrastructure has been a concern for public officials, politicians and Missourians on the whole.The Missouri Department of Transportation and state legislators have come up with a way to combat the department’s shrinking budget, but it’s up to Missouri voters to approve it. Amendment 7 will be on the August ballot: it’s a three quarter cent statewide sales tax increase on everything except groceries and medicine.

If you had $1.49 billion for transportation projects, how would you spend it? Would you repair highways? Bolster mass transit service? Enhance bike lanes?

This isn’t some academic exercise. The St. Louis region’s political leaders are considering how to divide the potential proceeds from a 0.75 percent sales tax increase for transportation. These decisions could have a transformative impact on how St. Louis area residents get around.

But here’s the twist: You have to make this decision very, very quickly.

Flickr User Jack Snell

  Damage to railroad tracks caused by last week's flash flooding in west-central Missouri is forcing changes in Amtrak passenger service.

The Missouri Department of Transportation says that some passengers on Amtrak's Missouri River Runner between Kansas City and St. Louis will travel by bus instead of train this week.

Heavy rain last Thursday damaged a section of track east of Warrensburg. Union Pacific is doing repairs that require afternoon closings through Friday.

The Wingy / Flickr

Missouri transportation officials are taking a closer look at how freight can be moved more efficiently across the state by trucks, barges, planes and trains.

File / KBIA

Even with a potential federal government shutdown next week, some of Missouri’s programs and agencies will continue to operate as usual.

Emily Cain, the press secretary for the federal Office of Management and Budget, said that the Obama administration believes that a lapse in appropriations will not occur.

In addition, she said that the administration is “willing to work with Congress to enact a short-term continuing resolution to fund critical government operations.”

Samantha Edmonson

The Missouri Department of Transportation has begun re-opening many Mid-Missouri roads and highways that were closed due to flooding, but some county roads are still affected, particularly those near the Osage River.

MODOT reopened the 14 mile stretch of I-44 near Jerome southwest of Rolla Thursday morning, which had been closed for nearly 24 hours. Highway 63 near Westphalia was also closed Wednesday afternoon due to water on the road, but that route was also re-opened Thursday morning.

Dave Herholz / Flickr

Ridership on Amtrak's Missouri River Runner passenger trains between Kansas City and St. Louis has increased for the sixth straight year.

MoDOT says nearly 197,000 passengers rode the train in the fiscal year that ended June 30. That's an increase of roughly 5,000 riders from the previous year.

The increase means more revenue from tickets, which reduces the financial support required from the state. Ticket revenue was $5.4 million in the latest fiscal year, compared with $5 million the previous year.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

File photo / MoDot

  Missouri has received a federal grant to test a new type of road treatment intended to keep cars from slipping off highways when it rains or snows.

The Missouri Department of Transportation says it will apply the "high friction surface treatment" to a pair of curves on U.S. 54 and Missouri 179 in Jefferson City.

If the agency has enough money, it may also apply the treatment at two sites on Interstate 44 near Rolla.

File photo / MoDot

Missouri is one of 13 states that will get federal grant money to improve road conditions.

As a part of the Everyday Counts initiative Missouri was granted $150,000 to implement new road technology to improve road safety. Travis Koestner, Assistant District Engineer at Missouri Department of Transportation, says this money will go towards a road re-surfacing project using High Friction Surface Treatment. 

Missouri S&T

As avid explorers of drone technology ourselves, we were excited to hear about Missouri S&T's experiments using drones to aid in bridge inspection. Full Disclosure: I run the Missouri Drone Journalism Program, which is no stranger to controversy.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Mo. report finds racial disparity in traffic stops
  • MoDOT names new chief engineer
  • Drivers asked to be cautious due to heavy rainfall
Photo courtesy of the Missouri Department of Transportation

The Missouri Department of Transportation has a new chief engineer.

Transportation director Dave Nichols has tapped Ed Hassinger for the post. Hassinger was the department's top engineer for the St. Louis region for the last 12 years. He has been with the department for almost 30 years.

What's wrong with bridges in Missouri?

May 29, 2013
bodkin / Flickr

The collapse of a county highway bridge in southeast Missouri on Saturday was almost certainly not due to structural defects. And the fact that this collapse came on the heels of a similar disaster in Washington state is unfortunate but not necessarily related. Yet it's just a plain fact that bridges in Missouri are aging rapidly and are in serious need of repair.


Civil engineers say Missouri's infrastructure gets only a C-minus.

The regional chapters of the American Society of Civil Engineers released the letter grade Wednesday. It is part of a report card that evaluated the state's aviation, bridges, dams, drinking water, energy, inland waterways, levees, railroads, roads, schools and wastewater. Each sub-category also received a grade.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A proposed 1-cent sales tax for transportation has stalled in the Missouri Legislature.

The sales tax proposal was projected to generate nearly $8 billion over a decade for state highways, local roads and other modes of transportation such as railroads, airports, mass transit and river ports. Cities and counties would each get 5 percent of the revenues, with the rest going to state projects. Voters would have had to approve the tax in 2014 to enact the proposal.

amandabhslater / Flickr

The Missouri Department of Transportation reports that it's filled more than 10,000 potholes in central Missouri in the past month, as part 0f its "Missouri Pothole Patrol" program to address problems on roadways produced by the spring thawing.  MoDot launched the pothole patrol in mid-march in an effort to fix Missouri potholes as soon as possible. 

The program was in effect from March 18th to April 15th.  Mo-Dot’s Sally Oxenhandler says that even though the department filled over ten thousand potholes, there is still work to be done.

Evan Townsend / KBIA

For Earth Day,  the Missouri Department of Transportation hosted its 11th annual “No MOre Trash! Bash. Department employees volunteered to pick up litter and debris along a stretch of Route 94 in Callaway "County.  This year nine people showed up to spend a few off-the-clock hours taking care of Missouri’s roads. 

The event is a way for MoDOT to highlight their Adopt-a-Highway program, where anyone can volunteer to maintain a stretch of roadway. District engineer David Silvester says he hopes raising awareness of the program will also get more volunteers.


The Missouri Department of Transportation has issued a travel advisory for the weekend because of anticipated snowfalls of up to three inches per hour that could make driving nearly impossible at times.

Rain is expected to turn to snow Saturday afternoon across the state, posing a risk for travelers because of the rate of snowfall and lack of visibility. The storm is expected to continue until about noon Sunday in the western part of Missouri and taper off across the state throughout the day.