Politics

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Updated to link to Hensley podcast - On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Republican attorney general nominee Josh Hawley to the program.

Hawley won the GOP primary for attorney general over state Sen. Kurt Schaefer by a landslide. He will square off against Democratic attorney general nominee Teresa Hensley, who is slated to record an episode of Politically Speaking next week.

For roughly a decade, the Democratic gubernatorial nominee was a firm opponent of campaign donation limits. When he voted to get rid of contribution curbs as a Republican state senator in 2006 and a Democratic state senator in 2008, he believed that an unlimited system would give Missourians a better sense of where money came from and where it was going.

But  Chris Koster abandoned his long-standing opposition to donation limits earlier this year and threw his support behind a proposed constitutional amendment that limits contributions to $2,600 for state-based offices. He says that the current system where million-dollar donations are relatively commonplace is completely out of control.

It’s mid-afternoon in a VFW Hall in Overland, and Eric Greitens has a room full of veterans at full attention. Two Medal of Honor recipients, Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris, just introduced Greitens, and he’s about to provide the crowd with details about his newest mission: Becoming governor of Missouri.

On campaign stops like these, the uniform of the former Navy SEAL is often a blazer, an Oxford-cloth shirt with no tie, and jeans. His speech delivery is disciplined, sharp and deliberate: At town halls and debates, Greitens argues that Jefferson City’s political class has faltered and failed.

In a sign of how competitive Missouri’s U.S. Senate contest has become, the two major candidates – Republican incumbent Roy Blunt and Democrat Jason Kander – held dueling roundtables with area military veterans.

Wednesday’s events were intended to underscore how both men are highlighting their armed services credentials, and emphasizing their concern about the problems facing the nation’s military.

Nine years ago, Chris Koster was a state senator, a former Cass County prosecutor and a rising star within the Missouri Republican Party. Many speculated he would eventually run for governor.

And now he is running for governor, but as a Democrat.

Koster switched parties in 2007,  a stunning move that has set the course for his unusual political career.  He remains the highest-profile politician in Missouri, at least in modern times, to have made such a move

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Rod Gelatt and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Is it November 8 yet?

 

On the Planet Tralfamador Americans are tuning into presidential debates that are enlightening, illuminating and helpful to voters.  There, on the other side of the galaxy, Americans are watching ads on TV and social media that are professionally and substantively addressing the issues that separate the candidates. There Americans are turning out to vote in record numbers in a national show of civic pride and duty.

 

 

via Flickr user justgrimes

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air.

The New York Times: “The New York Times lawyer responds to Donald Trump

Alison Barnes Martin

Martha Stevens left her social work and advocacy positions to run for the District 46 House of Representatives seat. Her job experiences gave her ideas for public policies on health care coverage. For Stevens, health care expansion is one of the most critical issues facing Missourians.

Stephen Webber
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

One of the most important issues on District 19 State Senate Democratic candidate Stephen Webber’s platform is strengthening funding for the University of Missouri, and K --12 education as well. He says this is important since education is a major employer in the district.

“But it's also more than that; it's also who we are, in terms of our cultural values, and how we identify ourself; we're an education community, and so it's important in all facets of this area,” Webber said.

Can you endure one more commentary about last week’s presidential debate? If not, tune to sister station KMUC for some fine classical music.

 

Still listening?

 

 

 

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations? Also, we’ll break down the first presidential debate, the coverage, the focus on fact-checking and Lester Holt’s performance as moderator. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo by Amy Simons (KBIA)

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations?

Caleb Rowden
File Photo / KBIA

  Republican State Representative Caleb Rowden is serving a second term in the Missouri House for District 44 and is running for the state senate seat in District 19, previously held by State Senator Kurt Schaefer. Rowden’s platform focuses on economic development, low taxes, government accountability and strengthening Missouri’s public education system.

The University of Missouri and public K-12 education serve as the centerpiece of Rowden’s campaign.

Last Thursday morning I opened my New York Times and choked on my coffee.  Once again Missouri was in the national news and not in a good way.  The lead editorial was a scathing critique of the Missouri legislature’s override of Governor Nixon’s veto of the change to the conceal-carry law.

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

Daniel Aubuchon

You can find Don Waterman working at the Columbia Bass Pro Shops, checking people out at the register or helping customers find what they’re looking for. But now he’s casting his line for the state legislature.

Waterman is running as the Republican candidate for the District 46 House of Representative’s seat. He got his first taste of politics by working for Danie Moore’s campaign in the 2008 state election primaries. Now, as a candidate, Waterman wants to tackle Missourians’ access to mental health facilities.

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people? Was there ever any doubt that Donald Trump’s interview with Larry King would end up on Vladimir Putin’s RT network? Also, what pressure did Matt Lauer’s performance during a candidate forum put on future debate moderators? Facebook’s about face on censoring an iconic photo from the Vietnam War, the role of the local gossip columnist. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people?

Callum Borchers, Washington Post: “Conservative media – and NPR – entertain the possibility of a Hillary Clinton replacement

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

When shoppers browse meat at the grocery store they are confronted with all kinds of brands and labels, making it hard to tell whether the meat they buy comes from animals that were raised humanely. Organic producers want to answer that question more clearly, but conventional farmers are charging that proposed changes to organic standards would amount to unfair government backing of the organic industry.

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Now, the network has announced a settlement – and it’s disclosing the details. Also, what’s the role of a debate moderator and the shortest story in the history of the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image courtesy of Fox News Channel

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Today, the network announced a settlement.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “Fox News has settled Gretchen Carlson’s sexual harassment suit for $20 million

Poor white people have been in the news a lot lately.  Most obviously they are a target voting group and natural constituency for Donald Trump.  But they are also the subject of some interesting recent non-fiction books.  One memoir entitled Hillbilly Elegy by a guy who grew up in rural Kentucky is actually a best seller, and a couple of others have had a real impact on how people think about this very large group of Americans.

The redoubtable conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, who led a movement that for decades successfully thwarted liberal and feminist causes, including the Equal Rights Amendment, and helped uber-conservative candidates win elections, has died. She was 92.

Mrs. Schlafly died Monday afternoon at her Ladue home, surrounded by her family. She had been battling cancer, said daughter Anne Cori.

Mrs. Schlafly was a self-described “lifetime fulltime volunteer in public policymaking.” Although she held three degrees, including a law degree, and worked her entire life, albeit most of it without pay, she championed the role of full-time homemaker as a woman’s highest calling.

claire mccaskill
studio08denver / flickr

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill has confirmed that she'll run for re-election in 2018.

The Springfield News-Leader reports the Missouri Democrat said Tuesday while visiting a National Guard facility at Springfield-Branson National Airport that she'll be "asking for another tour."

A McCaskill spokesman confirmed she intends to seek re-election.

Voters first elected McCaskill to the Senate in 2006. She defeated Republican Rep. Todd Akin to win re-election in 2012. She underwent breast cancer treatment this year, including surgery.

  The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data? Also, what happened when Facebook dropped its Trending Topics team, a USA Today report that gives some credence to Ryan Lochte’s story and a career development initiative designed to bring diverse candidates to newsrooms across the country. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data?

Jeff Jarvis: “Specimens of old journalism

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Aug. 28 means  that most of Missouri's new laws passed earlier this year are now in effect.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia? Also, another major shakeup in the Trump campaign, the end of Gawker, and Ryan Lochte’s fall from grace. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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