Politics

Political news

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too. Also, whether an editor’s decision discredits Katie Couric’s gun safety documentary, Donald Trump spars with reporters, and the debut of cable television’s ‘Roots’ reboot. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Steve Jurvetson

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too.

Nick Denton, Gawker: “An open letter to Peter Thiel

Austin Federa / KBIA

Regulations aimed at helping companies such as Uber and Lyft expand in Missouri died in the Legislature this year.

At issue is whether the ride-hailing companies are governed by uniform statewide rules or by varying rules from city to city. The companies say differing rules make it hard for them to do business. 

Updated with MNEA decision - One of two ballot initiatives that would increase Missouri’s cigarette tax may be in trouble. A Cole County judge has said the fiscal note on a 60-cent-a-pack proposal overestimates the revenue that would be raised. He has directed the auditor to review the projection, and that would invalidate the petitions turned in by Raise Your Hand for Kids.

The organization has said it will appeal.

File / KBIA

Missouri's Republican legislative leaders and more than 100 others say they oppose the Obama administration's directive on transgender student bathroom access.

Columns at University of Missouri
File Photo / KBIA

A former state lawmaker is suing over an associate University of Missouri law professor and attorney general candidate's emails.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate staffer has begun reviewing Planned Parenthood's internal records, including procedures for fetal tissue disposal.

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say they support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes? Also, St. Louis County drops the trespassing charges against two journalists arrested in Ferguson, the latest in the negotiations between Tribune Publishing and Gannett and the saga of Sumner Redstone and control of Viacom.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes?

Finding Humor in the Presidential Primaries

May 24, 2016

I’ve followed American politics since I was a kid.  I teach classes in it at Columbia College.  I talk to you occasionally about it.

Last fall and winter I was telling people, with a fair amount of confidence, that Hillary Clinton was on a glide path to a coronation and with only slightly less confidence that she would beat Jeb Bush in the general election.

The woman at the center of the New York Times’ story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it. Also, why a “little black dress” made headlines in Los Angeles and the debate as to whether ‘This American Life’ producer Ira Glass has forgotten the mission of public radio. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

If there’s one constant about the last week of the Missouri General Assembly’s session, it’s that nobody in the Capitol has to search very hard to find delicious pie.

For several decades, senators have served up rhubarb pies, French silk pies, and even gooseberry pies to hungry legislators and staff. The uncontroversial and widely celebrated “Pie Day” event provides a big boost to proprietors like the Rolling Pin in Glasgow, and a bit of levity within the General Assembly's intense final days.

The woman at the center of the New York Times' story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics.

Philip Bump, Washington Post: “Did Facebook bury conservative news? Ex-staffers say yes

Talking Politics - Election Clichés

May 10, 2016
Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

There has been no shortage of clichés to describe this presidential campaign.  But clichés are not necessarily wrong; they’re just tiresome.  Here are three of my favorites:

“It ain’t over till the fat lady sings.”  Actually, for the Democrats, it is over.  Clinton will be the nominee.


Barring another sex scandal, the Missouri General Assembly could be facing a low-key final week.

The thinner-than-usual final schedule reflects, in part, legislators' success this year — and last — in passing the state's bloc of budget bills early. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon was required to approve or veto by last Friday the state's planned spending for the fiscal year that begins July 1. He only used his line-item veto on two items on Friday; lawmakers overrode last week his earlier veto of their new school-funding formula.

For now, it’s all over but the counting. The Missouri Secretary of State’s office will be busy the next few weeks determining whether five initiative-petition proposals collected enough valid signatures to get on the state’s August or November ballot.

The rest of Missouri's budget for the next fiscal year has been signed into law.

Last week, Gov. Jay Nixon signed the budget bill for the Department of Higher Education into law, and on Thursday he signed into law the budget bill for the departments of Mental Health and Health and Senior Services. On Friday, he sign the remaining budget bills into law.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  The Missouri Legislature has authorized nearly $1 billion for maintaining state property and constructing new buildings.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 The Missouri House has passed a controversial "personhood" measure opponents say could ban abortion, including in cases of rape and incest.

You’d never say that to someone’s face, so why do people think it’s okay to tweet vile threats to journalists? On this week’s show, we’ll look at the #MoreThanMean campaign and how two female sports journalists hope to change the narrative. Also, who was Larry Wilmore really roasting at Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner, GQ’s profile of Melania Trump, an whether Arianna Huffington can strike a balance between her business and editorial roles. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: Just Not Sports

You’d never say that to someone’s face, so why do people think it’s okay to tweet vile threats to journalists? On this week’s show, we’ll look at the #MoreThanMean campaign and how two female sports journalists hope to change the narrative.

Juliet Macur, New York Times: “Social media, where sports fans congregate and misogyny runs amok

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Personal care attendants in Missouri will not be getting a pay raise.  The Nixon administration had sought to implement a pay hike agreed upon by home health care workers, but state lawmakers passed a bill blocking the pay hike, saying the legislature alone has the power to authorize pay raises.  

Annie Rees / KBIA

How does it feel to be the core focus of a small but impassioned protest?

Senator Kurt Schaefer—who was the subject of Friday’s protest against his visit to the MU College Republicans—believes it shows that he’s making an impact. “When you’re not effective, people don’t pay any attention to you, and when you are effective, they do. And that’s just how it works,” Schaefer said Friday.

Over Half of Missouri House Seats Go Unopposed

Apr 29, 2016

In the 2016 general election, there will only be 70 races in which Missouri voters will have a choice to vote for a Republican or a Democrat for state representative. In the other 93 state house districts, there will only be a candidate from one party or the other.

University of Missouri Political Science Professor Peverill Squire says this brings questions of democracy to light.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

 The leader of Missouri's House says he doesn't expect there will be an effort to revive a contested measure to protect some businesses opposed to same-sex marriage.

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it. Also, Prince’s imprint on the record industry, why Kelly Ripa took a few days off from her ABC syndicated show, and cutting commercials from “Saturday Night Live” to keep an engaged audience. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Amy Simons / KBIA

After years of shedding debt, what prompted Gannett to make a hostile bid for Tribune Publishing? We’ll look at the $815 million deal, what it might mean for news consumers and why the Tribune executives are fighting it.

Roger Yu, USA Today: “Gannett offers $815 million to buy Tribune Publishing

Talking Politics - Presidential Dynasties

Apr 26, 2016
KBIA file photo

The 1980 election took place a generation ago – an eternity in politics -- and is remembered as the year Ronald Reagan defeated President Jimmy Carter’s bid for reelection.  What is less well remembered is that earlier in 1980, in the Democratic convention, Senator Ted Kennedy tried to defeat Carter for renomination.  His quest ended shortly after a disastrous television interview during which he could not sensibly answer the question about why he wanted to be president.


Pages