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Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


Updated at 5:04 p.m. ET

The U.S. Supreme Court will decide on gay marriage this term.

The justices said today they will review an appellate court's decision to uphold the ban on same-sex marriage in Ohio, Tennessee, Michigan and Kentucky. The four states are among 14 that ban same-sex marriage.

File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri House will require most bills to go through two committees before moving to the full chamber this year.

(Updated 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 9, 2015)

Despite all the gains that Missouri Republicans made in last fall’s balloting, the state party appears headed for a showdown shortly over who should be its leader heading into the crucial 2016 elections.

Two St. Louisans – incumbent state GOP chairman Ed Martin and former party executive director John Hancock – are competing in an election to determine who gets Martin's job.

j.stephenconn / flickr

A Missouri House committee is suggesting lawmakers reject a pay increase for statewide elected officials in 2017.

It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


david_shane / Flickr

Police killings of unarmed residents in Missouri, New York and elsewhere have prompted an array of proposed policy changes as legislatures across the nation began their new sessions. 

Pity the poor guys who are trying to run for president while still serving as governors.

All the media attention this week went to former Govs. Mitt Romney and Jeb Bush, because Romney suddenly decided to call in his chits and get back in the presidential conversation for 2016. Virtually every news organization in North America instantly got wide-eyed about it.

The first post-attack edition of Charlie Hebdo has sold out in France, just hours after it was released.

France 24 reports that people lined up in front of newsstands as they opened. The network adds:

via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?

david_shane / Flickr

Members of a changed Missouri legislative committee will deal with concerns raised after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown.

Putting an end to the speculation, U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill says she won't run for governor in 2016.

The Missouri Democrat told KCUR's Steve Kraske she made the decision over the holidays with her family.

"At the end of the day, you have to ask yourself if the job you're thinking about going for is better than the one you have, and can you do more?" McCaskill says.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

Several elected officials say some of Missouri's top leaders tried unsuccessfully to pressure Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson to resign after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown.

missouri capitol
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

A Missouri lawmaker wants to ban recipients of a federal food assistance program from using those benefits to buy energy drinks.

Democratic state Rep. Keith English of Florissant filed legislation recently to prevent Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program funds from buying the drinks.

On his first day in his new job, freshly minted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., designated the Keystone XL pipeline bill as Senate Bill 1 --the first legislation introduced under his leadership.

That signaled more than just McConnell's own support for the bill. The prestige of being S-1 also conveys a sense of the priority and urgency Senate Republicans in general attach to the project, which would permit the pipeline to cross the U.S.-Canada border and carry crude oil from the tar sands of Alberta to the Gulf Coast.

(This post was last updated at 6:50 p.m. ET.)

A nationwide manhunt for the suspects of France's deadliest terrorist attack in more than 50 years ended in a hail of gunfire on Friday.

After hours of tension in two separate standoffs that shut down parts of the Paris metro area, the two main suspects in the attack on a satirical magazine and a man who took hostages at a kosher grocery are dead, President François Hollande said in a speech to the nation.

Stoplight
File Photo / KBIA

Nearly 900,000 people who paid fines for red-light violations in Missouri can apply for partial refunds as part of a proposed settlement of a class action lawsuit.

The lawsuit was filed against American Traffic Solutions, which operated the cameras in 27 Missouri cities. The settlement is for violations between 2005 and November 2014.

kander
KBIA

Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander is asking lawmakers to cut dozens of filing fees to help the state attract new businesses.

On Thursday, Kander announced the fee cut as part of his agenda for the 2015 legislative session.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA file photo

The speed limit on portions of Interstate I-70 in Columbia is dropping to 60 mph.

The Missouri Department of Transportation on Thursday announced the former 70 mph speed limit will be reduced for safety on less than 3 miles of the interstate.

French authorities are still on the hunt for two brothers suspected in an attack against the headquarters of a satirical magazine in Paris that left 12 people dead.

The two chief suspects, named as Said and Chérif Kouachi, 34 and 32, remain at large. Investigators believe Said Kouachi traveled to Yemen in 2011 to receive weapons training with Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports, citing U.S. officials who've been briefed on the case.

The Keystone XL pipeline, which would carry crude oil from Canadian oil sands down to the U.S. Gulf Coast, isn't just an infrastructure project. It's also a symbol for the fight over the future of energy.

Producing oil from Alberta's tar sands emits more pollution than traditional oil drilling, so many environmentalists want that crude left in the ground. And more broadly, they want the world to turn away from climate-changing fossil fuels toward cleaner forms of energy, like wind and solar.

KBIA file photo

A Missouri state senator is calling for Gov. Jay Nixon to resign for "failed leadership" during the protests in Ferguson following the fatal shooting of a Michael Brown.

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

On Tuesday, January 7, French authorities confirmed three gunman shot and killed 12 people in Paris at the offices of the weekly satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The paper has run cartoons and other content satirizing radical Islam, and the Prophet Mohammed. In 2011, the paper was firebombed. 

French President Francois Holland called the shootings a "terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity" and video shows armed gunman running through the streets of Paris. As of the shows' recording, the suspects remain at large. 

  A gunman targets Paris weekly Charlie Hebdo known for satirizing Islam and the prophet Mohammed.  Also, a preview of the legislative session now underway in Jefferson City, why Kirby Delauter doesn’t want his name in the press,  the historical accuracy of the film Selma, and remembering ESPN’s Stuart Scott.  From the Missouri School of Journalism, Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Bob Priddy: Views of the News.


When a 2011 firebombing destroyed the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, editor Stephane Charbonnier said the publication would not shy away from taking jabs at radical Islam.

"If we can poke fun at everything in France, if we can talk about anything in France apart from Islam or the consequences of Islamism, that is annoying," Charbonnier said at the time. "This is the first time we have been physically attacked, but we won't let it get to us."

Jacky Naegelen / Reuters

Catch our show today at 6:30pm on KBIA

Terrorists Kill 12 at Paris Paper

Three gunmen killed 12 people and injured several more at a weekly Paris newspaper that has satirized Islam and the prophet Mohammed.

Nicholas Vinocur and Antony Paone, Reuters, "At least 12 dead in Paris attack on satirical newspaper"

Updated at 10 p.m. ET.

At least 12 people were killed during a shooting at the headquarters of the satirical Charlie Hebdo weekly in Paris, police say. Two key suspects remain at large (see our latest post for updates).

columbia city hall
File Photo / KBIA

The Columbia City Council unanimously approved the formation of a youth advisory council at its meeting on Monday. 

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A Missouri lawmaker is again pushing legislation that would shift regulation of farm-raised deer to state agriculture officials. 

ginny chadwick
Jack Howard / KBIA

Ginny Chadwick resigned from her seat as Columbia’s 1st Ward councilmember this week. 

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