Politics

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Rader Puts Final Campaign Effort into Greektown

Apr 7, 2015
Emerald O'Brien / KBIA

Dan Rader spent the final 12 hours of campaign time trying to get his name out, although in a less than conventional manner. Rader is running for Columbia’s First Ward City council seat against six other candidates, and he used bright blue shirts, buses touting signs and a man in a gorilla suit with a megaphone to set himself apart.

He and his campaign seemed focused on MU’s campus, and specifically Greektown.

This week’s Politically Speaking breaks some new ground. Through the magic of radio, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies joined with KBIA’s Bram Sable-Smith to interview state Rep. Caleb Rowden.

The Columbia Republican and Rock Bridge High School graduate was first elected to the Missouri House in 2012. Rowden had a somewhat unconventional road to Missouri state politics: He was a successful Christian rock musician before running for a vacant House seat in 2012.

I've rarely seen President Obama speak in such definite terms on a thorny issue as he did yesterday about the nuclear agreement with Iran.

Updated at 11:39 a.m.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and his son Jeb Bush Jr. have responded to a news report that the likely Republican presidential candidate self-identified as Hispanic in a 2009 voter-registration application.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Governor Jay Nixon has issued his first veto of the season on a measure he says would unfairly penalize experienced school administrators.

The bill Nixon vetoed Friday would have barred former school superintendents from serving on school boards in the same district where they worked.

Updated at 11:30 p.m. EDT

A report commissioned to determine what went awry in a retracted Rolling Stone article about campus rape at the University of Virginia found repeated, fundamental errors in the magazine's reporting and editing process.

Last month, Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed a bill bringing back the firing squad as a method of execution. The state abandoned firing squads in 2004 but now, it has returned as the backup option — partly because of a shortage of lethal injection drugs, the state's default execution method.

Utah is now the only state in the U.S. that authorizes execution by firing squad.

It's not hard to reach presidential candidate Ryan Shepard; he doesn't have a media relations office or a slick-tongued press secretary.

Shepard, 40, is a bartender at Roc Brewing Co. in Rochester, N.Y., while also working toward a bachelor's degree in creative writing at nearby SUNY Brockport. He plans to enroll in an master of fine arts writing program after he graduates.

He is also just as much a candidate for U.S. president as Ted Cruz, who was billed by many as the first and only candidate to file so far.

Higher Revenues Lead Missouri Governor to Release Funds

Apr 3, 2015
nixon
File photo / KBIA

  State building repairs, technology startups, local libraries and university programs are among the recipients sharing $43 million dollars in funding released by Missouri's governor.

The Missouri House on Tuesday passed the same ethics reform bill passed two months ago by the Senate, but not before making a few changes.

An audit released Thursday takes issue with some spending decisions made by the Missouri Department of Transportation.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri Senate committee has endorsed a budget plan that its chairman says will constrain the state's fastest-growing costs. 

Salaries for Missouri state employees rank near the bottom of the nation. To change that, some state legislators on Thursday called for making a raise a priority in coming years.

Joined by the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, and state Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, said they want a five-year plan to raise those salaries. They did not outline a specific plan Thursday, but said they hoped to get the discussion started.

Following a firestorm of criticism, Republican governors in Indiana and Arkansas signed revised versions of their states' Religious Freedom Restoration bills Thursday night. In Indiana the language was adjusted, and in Arkansas it was significantly scaled back to more closely align with the federal law.

Bob McCulloch Spoke on MU's Campus, But to a Select Group

Apr 2, 2015
KARA TABOR / KBIA

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke at the Missouri School of Law on Tuesday about the grand jury process. McCulloch was the lead prosecutor to handle the jury during the Ferguson case that decided not to indict former officer Darren Wilson who shot and killed Michael Brown last August. 

The event was not heavily promoted. Instead, it was only open to students, faculty and staff of the MU Law School who had to register for the event. The student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized McCulloch's appearance, and said due to full capacity of Hulston Hall the public was not allowed in, including the media. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 


Rep. Chuck Basye never thought he would have the title of Missouri state representative next to his name.

“The closest I [ever] got was I considered running for school board years ago, but the job that I had just didn’t allow that,” Basye said. “This was just all a timing situation. I was looking for something else to do.”

Justin Eagan / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) signed the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law Thursday, March 26. The law is said to allow businesses to refuse service citing religious reasons. The fear? Those in opposition to the law say this is legislated discrimination, and that it specifically targets the LGBTQ community. ABC'S George Stephanopoulos directly asked Pence if this law is discriminatory, and Pence dodged the question about seven times. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

File Photo / KBIA

A bill aimed at bolstering Missouri's agricultural industry is headed to the governor.

Missouri senators on Tuesday voted unanimously in favor of the measure, which previously was approved 101-48 by the House.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

  Despite concerns from Republican lawmakers about Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's withholding money from programs this year, most of his 2015 supplemental budget request is moving forward.

A Missouri House panel on Tuesday approved additional spending for 2015, including $120 million in general funds.

Republican lawmakers have previously criticized the request while the governor's office continues to withhold about $451 million from other priorities this year.

Spence Jackson / Linkedin

  The note left by the Missouri auditor's spokesman before his apparent suicide said "I just can't take being unemployed again."

Jefferson City Police Capt. Doug Shoemaker said Tuesday that the note from Spence Jackson was dated March 27.

Shoemaker also said Jackson died from a single gunshot wound to the head. Jackson was found dead Sunday in his Jefferson City apartment.

A controversial law in Indiana has made its way into the 2016 presidential race. Supporters praise the Religious Freedom Restoration Act's for protecting religious convictions, but the law has drawn wide criticism from those who say it allows businesses to discriminate against gay and lesbian patrons.

The ADA Legacy Tour Visits Mid-MO

Mar 31, 2015
KBIA

The American Disability Act Legacy Tour stopped in Columbia on Monday. The bus stopped at Activity and Recreation Center at University of Missouri at 9 a.m. before it moved to the Speaker’s Circle at 12:30 p.m.

The words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance and the phrase "In God we trust" on the back of a dollar bill haven't been there as long as most Americans might think. Those references were inserted in the 1950s during the Eisenhower administration, the same decade that the National Prayer Breakfast was launched, according to writer Kevin Kruse. His new book is One Nation Under God.

In the original Pledge of Allegiance, Francis Bellamy made no mention of God, Kruse says. Bellamy was Christian socialist, a Baptist who believed in the separation of church and state.

This is Part One in an occasional series of features on campaign finance, called "Money Rules."

The hunt for big bucks is changing the way politicians run for president.

When a candidate finally admits he or she is a candidate, donors are limited to gifts of $2,700. (A donor can give an additional $2,700 if the candidate makes it through to the general election.)

Tom Schweich’s Media Director Spence Jackson Found Dead

Mar 30, 2015
Spence Jackson / Linkedin

Missouri state official Spence Jackson, who was the media director for Tom Schweich, was found dead Sunday from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound according to the Jefferson City Police Department. He was 44.

Jackson’s apparent suicide comes about one month after Missouri State Auditor Schweich’s suicide last month.

Jackson had become very outspoken about Schweich’s suicide. He called for the resignation of Republican state Chairman John Hancock, because of Schweich’s allegation that Hancock had conducted an anti-Semitic “whispering campaign” against Schweich.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence — facing a major backlash from a new law that would allow businesses in the state to cite religious objections to refuse to serve gay people — says he supports an effort to "clarify the intent" of the legislation while acknowledging surprise over the hostility it has sparked.

While in Europe, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s trade entourage has held a lot of meetings, but so far has yet to strike any deals.

That was the message in the governor’s progress report, delivered via a telephone call Wednesday from Munich in Germany.

About four months before the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, police less than 15 miles down I-70 in St. Charles shot another man named Brown. The event barely drew any attention from anyone except immediate family and friends.

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