right to work

www.timwjones.com

The first bill being considered by a Missouri House committee this year would prohibit the payment of union fees from being a condition of employment.

The legislation, known as "right to work," is scheduled for a Monday hearing in the House Workplace Development and Workplace Safety Committee.

It is a top priority for Republican House Speaker Tim Jones, of Eureka. He led a rally of about 100 activists in support of the bill before the legislative session opened last week.

The Missouri General Assembly's 2014 session is underway, and the first day sounded a lot like last year's session.

In his opening remarks, House Speaker Tim Jones, R-Eureka, laid out his agenda for this year's regular session: medical malpractice reform, making Missouri a right-to-work state, and cutting taxes.

Missouri lawmakers open their annual session Wednesday with some different priorities than those of Gov. Jay Nixon.

File Photo / KBIA

After recent successes in Michigan and Indiana, supporters of "right-to-work" laws now are focusing their efforts on Missouri, Ohio and Oregon. But instead of relying on potentially reluctant governors to enact the measures, they are looking to place the issue before voters.

In Missouri, the Republican-led Legislature will consider whether to refer the measure to the 2014 ballot.

Two dozen states currently have "right-to-work" laws that prohibit union fees from being a condition of employment.

KBIA file photo

Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder is predicting that voters will get a chance to decide whether to make Missouri the 25th state to enact a right-to-work law.

The St. Louis branch of the NAACP is teaming up with local labor union groups to fight against efforts in Jefferson City to turn Missouri into a right-to-work state.


Chapter President Adolphus Pruitt says African-Americans are more likely to be union members than any other ethnicities in the United States, so the partnership makes sense.


“Right-to-work is a problem that exists across the country," Pruitt said.  "It’s trying to rear its ugly head up here in Missouri, (and) we’re gonna find a way to fight it back.”

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Labor union members from across Missouri descended on the State Capitol today, hoping to convince lawmakers to defeat bills they say are anti-worker.

File / KBIA

A Missouri House committee is taking up legislation that would bar union membership or dues as a condition of employment.

The House Workforce Development Committee scheduled a public hearing Wednesday on the bill, which supporters call "right to work."

Approval by the Legislature would put the proposed new law to a statewide vote this November.
Supporters argue the legislation would allow Missouri to be more competitive in the job market. Opponents say it would weaken unions and hinder collective bargaining.
 

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