Science and Technology

The Anatomy Of A Splash

Apr 8, 2017

Giant Viruses Beefed Up On Host Genomes

Apr 8, 2017

Climate change might leave a bad taste in your mouth. Literally.

Apr 3, 2017

The conversation about food and climate change often centers on how a warming climate will affect the quantity of food we can harvest. But as it turns out, a warmer world could change the quality, even the flavor, of our favorite foods, too — from the maple syrup that we slather on our pancakes to the tea that we brew before work.

“Tea is similar to maple syrup, in that it needs specific environmental conditions for an ideal harvest,” says Selena Ahmed, an assistant professor of sustainable food and bioenergy systems at Montana State University.

Engineering a Better Bionic Arm

Apr 1, 2017

A Life Robotic

Apr 1, 2017

Tweaking the Dinosaur Family Tree

Apr 1, 2017

Falling Into New Ideas

Apr 1, 2017

Retelling the Story of the BP Oil Spill

Mar 25, 2017

Can Geometry Root Out Gerrymandering?

Mar 25, 2017

Training Docs Around the Clock

Mar 25, 2017

Why Are We Here? Physics Has Answers.

Mar 18, 2017

Visualizing the Beauty of Vibrato

Mar 18, 2017

Trump Versus the EPA

Mar 11, 2017

Scrap Your Dinner Plans

Mar 11, 2017

The Microbiome of the Clouds

Mar 11, 2017

The Secret (Smart) Life of Bees

Mar 4, 2017

Back When the Planet Had Just One Plate

Mar 4, 2017

In 2014, the city of Flint, Michigan changed the source of its water from the city of Detroit to the Flint River. But in the transition to river water, officials didn’t implement proper anti-corrosion measures. Lead leached from old pipes into the water supply, and in some homes, lead levels measured 10 times higher than the limit set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Last month, lead levels in Flint's city water finally tested below federal-action level. But residents are still being cautioned to use filters on their faucets, or to drink bottled water.

Harvard researchers say they’ve created metallic hydrogen

Feb 25, 2017

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe — and we know it mainly as a gas, not a metal. But in 1935, the physicists Eugene Wigner and Hillard Bell Huntington theorized that under high enough pressures, hydrogen could actually become metallic.

Since then, scientists have tried all sorts of techniques to create metallic hydrogen. Now, reporting in the journal Science, researchers at Harvard University say they’ve squeezed hydrogen between two diamonds — and made metal happen.

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