solar eclipse

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ANGELA SPECK, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Missouri! In her fourth and final appearance (related to this Monday's solar eclipse, natch), Angela tells us about the dangers of staring at the sun. Her advice? If you can see any part of the sun, wear your solar eclipse glasses! August 18, 2017

Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

 

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun.

But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen.

“It's never really been studied systematically,” says Angela Speck, director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. “We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they’re receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?”

Today Paul Pepper visits with MARY RATLIFF, President of the Columbia chapter of the NAACP, about a planned gathering of local officials and community members to discuss Columbia's recent racial profiling report. The objective, with your input. will be to prioritize possible solutions. Watch for details! At [4:32] JILL DUDLEY invites everyone to "Foodstock," an all-day celebration of the solar eclipse, and a fundraiser for Serve It Up CoMo, a non-profit that supports other non-profits. Make plans to come early and stay late! August 15, 2017

Nathan Lawrence

Central Missouri is on the path of totality for the upcoming solar eclipse. That means that the sun will completely disappear from view for a few minutes during the middle of the day. Intersection's Sara Shahriari and Harvest Public Media reporter Kris Husted talk with Mizzou Professor and Director of Astronomy Angela Speck about studying animal reactions, citizen data gathering and exactly how the moon and the sun line up to create daytime darkness. 

File Photo / KBIA

Missouri state workers in Jefferson City are getting an extra holiday this year — Aug. 21, the day of the solar eclipse.

State officials said Friday that with up to 50,000 visitors expected in Jefferson City to see the eclipse from one of the best viewing spots in the nation, state workers in non-essential jobs in the capital city will get the day off.

State workers elsewhere in Missouri will have to report to work.

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ANGELA SPECK, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Missouri. Angela talks about just how fast the moon's shadow will move across the United States on August 21st, and what MoDOT is doing to make sure drivers (who find themselves in the path of totality) stay safe! July 21, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with MEGAN McCONACHIE, Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau, about the many activities planned for the weekend before the total solar eclipse that's happening on August 21st! Don't miss out on a bike ride, a 5K and, of course, a "Totality Music Festival." Watch for details! At [4:00] JEFF MORAN, a.k.a. "Dr. Chordate," performs his original song, "E-Clipse-O," that he dedicates to the solar eclipse experience. July 20, 2017

Today Paul Pepper welcomes back ANGELA SPECK, Professor of Astronomy at the University of Missouri. Angela takes us on tour of www.greatamericaneclipse.com - a great way to find out just how long you'll get to enjoy the path of totality during this summer's solar eclipse! June 23, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with DR. RICK FRAUNFELDER, Director, Mason Eye Institute, about keeping your eyes safe during the upcoming solar eclipse. Dr. Fraunfelder encourages everyone to wear special glasses - not sunglasses! - to avoid "thermal burn" during the partial phases of the eclipse. At [4:54] meet Missouri River Regional Library Bookmobile drivers JON KARR and MARK WEGMAN! Their 40 foot bus will be making a "party stop" and "cool stops" throughout the summer - find out what that means and when they'll be in your neighborhood! June 12, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with MELANIE KNOCKE about what the Columbia Public Schools' Planetarium is doing to prepare everyone for the solar eclipse that's happening on August 21st! Plus, Melanie brought with her an animation that shows us just how the moon's shadow will move across the United States that day - watch! June 8, 2017

Today Paul Pepper and ANGELA SPECK, Professor, Director of Astronomy, MU, break down the science behind the upcoming total solar eclipse! If you have questions, odds are we have answers. In this interview, Angela takes us step by step from "first contact" at 11:45 a.m. through the "total phase" beginning at 1:12 p.m. | May 26, 2017

Today Paul Pepper visits with MEGAN McCONACHIE, Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau, about the total solar eclipse happening this August. "This is a great tourism opportunity for Columbia, so we're really going to take advantage of that." Get details on what's sure to be a festive couple of days! At [4:29] student actors LAUREN WAGNER and ETHAN SOLOMON invite everyone to come see Hickman High School Theatre's production of "Peter and the Starcatcher." 'Peter' is 'Peter Pan', and as with any good origin story, "everything is explained." See it this weekend only! April 25, 2017

NASA

Some small Missouri towns that'll offer a view next year's total solar eclipse are trying to prepare for the event. The Kansas City Star reports that the total solar eclipse will occur Aug. 21, 2017. 

Jenna Middaugh

    

A partial solar eclipse on Thursday has people looking forward to a total solar eclipse in the coming years.

MU Department of Physics and Astronomy hosted a viewing party Thursday afternoon at Laws Observatory so the community could catch a glimpse of the partial solar eclipse.

Ten-year-old Samuel Kingsley was at the event with his family and said he’s seen a blood moon before, but never a solar eclipse.

“It looked like someone bit the corner off the sun,” he said.

Samuel was just one of over 50 people who came out to watch the eclipse.