special education

Exploring the Paths of Missouri’s Special Education: A Study

Apr 28, 2015

  In 2006, Missouri Governor Matt Blunt asked the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to “examine best practices around the country for improving the delivery of services” for children with severe disabilities. The department commissioned a study which questioned the placement of children with disabilities in Missouri and other states.


Heather Adams / KBIA

Since 1975 schools have been mandated by law to provide free, appropriate education to all children, leaving states and schools to figure out what this means for educating children with special needs.The first school for the deaf in the United States opened in the early 1800’ s in Hartford, Connecticut.Since then new educational opportunities and laws have created a wide range of choices for students with disabilities.When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, there was a push for more inclusive education.This meant the closure of many separate, state - funded schools for the disabled across the country and new integration for children in standard public schools.But Missouri still has 34 state schools for the severely disabled. 


Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education: A History

Apr 13, 2015

When Genise Montecello was growing up her brother was separated from his peers and taken to a classroom off to the side, which she remembers being about the size of a broom closet. Her brother has a disability and she feels his education wasn’t seen as important because of this.

“People don’t remember to take into account students with disabilities and their accommodations they might need,” Montecello said. “So, it happens more frequently than people would believe that it does.”

Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education: A Primer

Apr 7, 2015

Experts and parents alike have been confused on whether Missouri is really the last state to have separate, state funded schools for the severely disabled.

When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, the U.S. witnessed a rapid change in special education, including a push for more inclusive education. This meant the closure of many of these separate schools across the country, but Missouri still has 34.

This story is one of five in a series, "Exploring the Paths of Missouri's Special Education." Check for an update next week, where you’ll find a story on the history of special education across the nation, and here at home.