standardized testing


The scores of Missouri schoolchildren on a test known as the nation's report card have held relatively steady.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress results were released Wednesday. They show that reading scores held steady for Missouri fourth and eighth graders over the last two years, while nationally they were flat for fourth graders and lower for eighth graders.

Nationally, math scores slipped. In Missouri, the math scores for fourth and eighth graders also were lower — but only slightly.

Most Missouri students scored at least proficient in English on a new statewide test last school year, while students in most grades scored lower in math.

The scores released Tuesday by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education are the first from a new assessment given in the spring.

Revised English and math standards based on the national Common Core guidelines for student learning were fully implemented for the first time last school year. The test was meant to gauge how well students are learning those new standards.

Both houses of Congress have now passed versions of the bill that would update the largest federal education law, known as No Child Left Behind, for the first time since 2001. They are big, meaty and complicated, and now they have to be reconciled into one messy Dagwood sandwich of a bill to go to the president.

albertogp123 / FLICKR

The Jefferson City Board of Education wants to implement a new test to better prepare its students for the future.

Members of the administration discussed a new format of a standardized test for eighth graders that would require them to answer in-depth questions about a given story.

Jefferson City Superintendent Brian Mitchell believes this new assessment will help both students and board members.

Is school too easy or too boring?

Jul 10, 2012

NPR reports that a survey by the National Assessment of Educational Progress shows that many students are simply "not being challenged in school." Parents, what's your take?