todd richardson

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Missouri's Republican legislative leaders and more than 100 others say they oppose the Obama administration's directive on transgender student bathroom access.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

 The leader of Missouri's House says he doesn't expect there will be an effort to revive a contested measure to protect some businesses opposed to same-sex marriage.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The House has voted to send a supplemental budget bill to the Senate that calls for nearly $500 million more in spending this year.

For his final state budget, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is taking no risks.

His proposed budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 features no grand gestures of setting up new programs, and calls for limited increases for the state’s current operations.

It appears that Republican leaders in the Missouri House and Senate are putting their money where their mouths are when it comes to ethics changes.

During his opening speech, House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said he'll refer all ethics bills to committee on Thursday, a move that often takes place days, weeks, and sometimes months after the start of a legislative session.

House Speaker Todd Richardson’s legislative career is full of defied expectations.

Before he was elected to House leadership, Richardson helped bring substantial changes to Missouri’s embattled Second Injury Fund – an issue that bedeviled lawmakers for years. And after the misdeeds of his predecessor, the Poplar Bluff Republican rose to the speakership much earlier than anybody expected.

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A Missouri lawmaker is seeking a special legislative session aimed at preventing Gov. Jay Nixon from allowing Syrian refugees to resettle in the state.

Missouri Capitol
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Missouri's state House leader has assembled a panel to review how to provide Medicaid health care.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

A group has been formed to review the Missouri House's intern policy after the former speaker admitted to exchanging sexually suggestive texts with an intern.

(Updated 11 a.m. Friday, May 15) Missouri Rep. Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, was elected and sworn in as new House speaker Friday, and swiftly got the House back to the business at hand — passing bills in the final hours of a surreal last week of session.

"This is not the time for speeches,'' Richardson said, ending tumultuous applause from the packed chamber. "This is a time to get back to work."

File Photo / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers are considering changes to the governor's authority over the state budget.

The discussion comes after budget disputes in recent years. Most recently, Gov. Jay Nixon froze $400 million in the current year's spending plan, while citing concerns lawmakers would override his veto of a tax cut.

Democratic Governor Jay Nixon has released just over half of the 400 million dollars he withheld earlier this year from Missouri’s current state budget.  215-million dollars will be divvied up among K-through-12 schools, higher education, mental health programs and specific programs for training health care professional in southwest Missouri.  Nixon released the money Thursday after Republican lawmakers on Wednesday failed to override his veto of a controversial tax cut bill.

The head of the Missouri Department of Revenue says his agency is not forwarding electronic copies of documents from Missouri citizens to the federal government.

Director Brian Long told the House Committee on Government Oversight and Accountability that once he heard the allegations, he questioned other officials and employees within the Department of Revenue about it.

“I was repeatedly and independently assured that these scanned source documents, as part of the license process, are not, nor is there any plans, to share them, again, with the federal government or any third-party vendor," Long said.

Legislation allowing Missourians to place their cell phone numbers on the state's telemarketing No Call List is moving forward.

KBIA file photo

The Missouri House has passed legislation that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls. 

The Thursday vote split exactly along party lines.

Democrats hammered away at Republicans’ arguments that the bill would combat voter fraud, saying there hasn’t been a documented case of voter fraud in decades – and that the bill does nothing to deal with voter registration fraud.  GOP House Member Todd Richardson of Poplar Bluff disagreed.