torture

Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

One of the big, controversial questions to emerge from the Senate investigation into the CIA interrogation of terrorism suspects is this: Did President George W. Bush know the specific techniques used by the CIA to interrogate terrorism suspects?

"The report is full of crap."

That's what former Vice President Dick Cheney told Fox News in an interview about a Senate investigation that found the Central Intelligence Agency used brutal techniques to interrogate terrorism suspects and then misled lawmakers, the White House and Congress about what they were doing.

Leaders on Capitol Hill are at odds regarding a report on CIA methods — including torture — used to extract information in the so-called war on terror.

Chairwoman of the Senate intelligence committee Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., has been fighting for the release of her 480-page executive summary of the report since April of this year, and it finally was scheduled for a reveal this week.

Joyu Wang / KBIA

National advocates called for local support against alleged U.S.-sponsored torture during the period following the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

This was the main theme of a lecture held at the Islamic Center of Central Missouri on Saturday evening.

Richard Killmer, executive director of the National Religious Campaign Against Torture, said torture is illegal and immoral.

"It doesn't only violate tenets of all religions, but torture also has made the country more insecure and unsafe," he said.